Amulet

Curious Questions for ULC Ministers

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The Tee-Up:

Your ordination is life long and doesn't expire. Acknowledgement of your ordination by the church is 24/7. You are also a participating member of the forum and possibly belong to other ULC groups on FB. 

 

I have a few curious questions referencing the above:

 

1. Does the acknowledgment of you being an ordained minister 24/7 mean that you are a full time minister because your ordination counts is acknowledged "always"? Or does the term "full time minister" have a different definition if applied to you, your beliefs and your lifestyle? Is there such a thing in your life as being a minister seasonally? Such as for peak wedding season, and then the rest of the year you make no claims about being a minister and perform no other ministerial duties to speak of?

 

2. Do you consider yourself to be an active minister? What does being an active minister mean for you? Would it mean you actively do "minister things" for a minimum number of hours out of your day or through the week? Does actively participating on the forum or in the ULC groups on FB mean you are an active minister? How regular would doing "minister things" have to be for you to consider yourself active? Is there something specific you think an active minister should be doing?

 

3. Does the church doctrine specifically come up for you as a reference when you have to weigh decisions now and then? For example, if you saw someone drop a $20 bill and they didn't notice and kept going. Or if you are counting calories/fat and had a choice between eating fries or steamed broccoli? I am not talking about conscience or obligation. I mean, do the actual words of the church doctrine "do that which is right" run through your mind in certain cases for making decisions? No? Yes? Sometimes? - Does it come up for you to use the church doctrine as a piece of advice when it applies to a situation? Like, you literally tell or remind someone "do that which is right?" (or even "do the right thing." but you thought of the doctrine.)

 

...No right or wrong answers. I am curious how members define some aspects for themselves as ordained ministers.

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I'm a minister the same way that I'm a man.  It's not about a job, or duties, or responsibilities, or schedules, or anything else.  It's what I am.  

 

My decisions to do what's right, are not based on church doctrine.  I was concerned with right and wrong before I was ordained.  Nothing has changed.

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An addendum:  I waited too long for editing.

 

Kirby Hensley had some regular arguments.  He would ask -- "How is a minister different from everybody else?".  He would then answer his own question.  "The minister has a certificate.  Do you want a certificate?  We have certificates."  It's clear to me, that Kirby never thought the clergy were a separate class of people.  

 

 

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I think of myself as a full time minister.  The way I define minister agrees with the dictionary under verb(go figure):  attend to the needs of (someone)

I generally tend to the needs of many people, sometimes people I know and sometimes strangers.  But like John Lennon said, "Better recognize your brother, everyone you meet"

I think of myself as a passive minister.  Strange sounding, now that I type it.  I am what I am on a regular basis, and if there is nobody around that I can tell is in need, then I am not actively ministering.  If I see someone who needs help, I try.  I guess I am semi active in that I volunteer my services and time on a regular basis.  I help out at food pantries.

Church doctrine means absolutely nothing to me.  I am a stoic, which really doesn't have ministers of the "faith" that I can determine.  Generally speaking, stoics act in accordance with what they believe to be right.  If I see someone drop a $20 I tell them, if I find money in the parking lot of Walmart(and I did recently, like a month ago) I take it to the service desk(at Walmart, they have a policy of holding on to the funds for a certain amount of time then if nobody claims it they donate the money to Children's Miracle Network).  If I see someone with a flat tire and it looks like they might need help, I stop and help.  I have jump started many a car, and have pushed a few off the road so that someone could try to fix a problem as well.  

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On 8/14/2017 at 7:38 AM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

I'm a minister the same way that I'm a man.  It's not about a job, or duties, or responsibilities, or schedules, or anything else.  It's what I am.  

 

My decisions to do what's right, are not based on church doctrine.  I was concerned with right and wrong before I was ordained.  Nothing has changed.

i have to agree with jonathan on this one.that is the way i would describe myself,only less wordy.

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I'm a minister because I want to support the ULC. I have no intention of using my ordination for anything other than proof of membership, if

that makes any sense.  I might ordain someone if they asked but that's as far as it would go.

 

I try to be a good person, though I haven't thought about the church doctrine while making day to day decisions.

 

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Greetings to you all my sisters and brothers,

 

This is an interesting question indeed.  In a Christian context, each person who claims to follow Christ is a full-time minister, in so far as we are called to live our lives as Christ taught 24/7.

 

Now in my view, a distinction does need to be made in how terms are used.  Typically a Christian would not use the term "full-time" to describe their lifestyle.  It is part and parcel of being a follower of Jesus. Even when we don't live the faith as best as we can, someone who really feels the call of Christ in their lives will try their best to live their faith on a full time basis, acknowledging that while we may be trying to go onto Christian perfection, we are generally still a long way off.

 

I think though that many people confuse the word "Minister" with "Pastor" or "Clergy".  These are really not the same things.  All Christians are ministers.  Pastors and clergy in general though are different.  Not better than the regular minister, but having a very specific function in the church.  They lead worship, administer the sacraments, preach, teach, and in general are the people who are paid to lead the church as specialists in their field.  In many churches, this is their paid jobs, and in the sense that I believe the term "full time" is used, this is their full-time job.  

 

In solidarity,

Rev. Calli

Edited by Rev. Calli

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On 8/14/2017 at 5:58 AM, Amulet said:

 

The Tee-Up:

Your ordination is life long and doesn't expire. Acknowledgement of your ordination by the church is 24/7. You are also a participating member of the forum and possibly belong to other ULC groups on FB. 

 

I have a few curious questions referencing the above:

 

1. Does the acknowledgment of you being an ordained minister 24/7 mean that you are a full time minister because your ordination counts is acknowledged "always"? Or does the term "full time minister" have a different definition if applied to you, your beliefs and your lifestyle? Is there such a thing in your life as being a minister seasonally? Such as for peak wedding season, and then the rest of the year you make no claims about being a minister and perform no other ministerial duties to speak of?

 

2. Do you consider yourself to be an active minister? What does being an active minister mean for you? Would it mean you actively do "minister things" for a minimum number of hours out of your day or through the week? Does actively participating on the forum or in the ULC groups on FB mean you are an active minister? How regular would doing "minister things" have to be for you to consider yourself active? Is there something specific you think an active minister should be doing?

 

3. Does the church doctrine specifically come up for you as a reference when you have to weigh decisions now and then? For example, if you saw someone drop a $20 bill and they didn't notice and kept going. Or if you are counting calories/fat and had a choice between eating fries or steamed broccoli? I am not talking about conscience or obligation. I mean, do the actual words of the church doctrine "do that which is right" run through your mind in certain cases for making decisions? No? Yes? Sometimes? - Does it come up for you to use the church doctrine as a piece of advice when it applies to a situation? Like, you literally tell or remind someone "do that which is right?" (or even "do the right thing." but you thought of the doctrine.)

 

...No right or wrong answers. I am curious how members define some aspects for themselves as ordained ministers.

In my perspective, I am a minister 24/7, 365. I may not actively participate in functions all the time, but I am ready if called to do so.

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Very interesting questions.  I am a full time minister 24/7.  I would perform any ministry duty called up to perform 24/7.  I am not seasonal as I do this all year.
 
I consider myself active as I do marriages all year.  I have only done one memoral service but Im open to any service that ministers do.  I dont work in a mainstrem organized church but would if asked and being a women not many of them would ask.
 
The doctrine of "do that which is right" which I believe is the heart and soul of ULC is forever at the for front of everything I do and dont do.  If I were so inclined it would make for a great Tattoo with the ULC logo above it!

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On 8/14/2017 at 4:04 PM, cuchulain said:

I think of myself as a full time minister.  The way I define minister agrees with the dictionary under verb(go figure):  attend to the needs of (someone)

I generally tend to the needs of many people, sometimes people I know and sometimes strangers.  But like John Lennon said, "Better recognize your brother, everyone you meet"

I think of myself as a passive minister.  Strange sounding, now that I type it.  I am what I am on a regular basis, and if there is nobody around that I can tell is in need, then I am not actively ministering.  If I see someone who needs help, I try.  I guess I am semi active in that I volunteer my services and time on a regular basis.  I help out at food pantries.

Church doctrine means absolutely nothing to me.  I am a stoic, which really doesn't have ministers of the "faith" that I can determine.  Generally speaking, stoics act in accordance with what they believe to be right.  If I see someone drop a $20 I tell them, if I find money in the parking lot of Walmart(and I did recently, like a month ago) I take it to the service desk(at Walmart, they have a policy of holding on to the funds for a certain amount of time then if nobody claims it they donate the money to Children's Miracle Network).  If I see someone with a flat tire and it looks like they might need help, I stop and help.  I have jump started many a car, and have pushed a few off the road so that someone could try to fix a problem as well.  

This is ministering in the finest sense of the word. Doing only that which is right. Although a simple sounding phrase, it emcompasses a lot of territory. It is also my  philosophy. It gives me joy to be able to help people in need or to simply do that which is right - returning money to someone you saw drop it: I have done that as well. I guess one of my greatest moments is when I was driving a taxi and came upon this elderly lady one Christmas eve stranded in Atlanta because she missed her bus and would not be able to be with her family for Christmas. I drove her to Chattanooga, Tenn. When we got there, It was heartwarming to see the smile upon her face as she ran and hugged her children and grandchildren. They asked what the charge was, and I told them it was very specific: To pass on the deed when they came across someone in need and they could help.

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These are all great perspectives and I love the replies that have come in so far.  It is so interesting to see how everyone's approach to "minister" applies primarily (as a noun/adjective/verb) and the thoughts about the church doctrine.

 

I consider myself a full time minister. The interesting thing for me, is that I am doing ministering type of work all the time but if it is not specifically for ULC, I don't think of it as minister work. I am a minister doing minister work but without thinking of it that way. I never thought about why. Is it like that for anyone else who is actively engaging with members of the community?

 

 

 

 

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You have me thinking, a lot, ministry for women is not very accepted, even now.  I officiate but once in while we get a request for my Son, they want a man to officiate.  I minister to friends and minster to neighbors by example and helping when I can.  I would love to do more volunteering but I take care of my husband who can cook for him self and needs help getting up and down, so I'm pretty much at home.  When we have a wedding my Son goes with me and we don't stay so we can get back home.  Its hard I am proud to be a ULC ordained but now that I think about it a minister not in the normal sense LOL.

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22 hours ago, Joyful said:

You have me thinking, a lot, ministry for women is not very accepted, even now.  I officiate but once in while we get a request for my Son, they want a man to officiate.  I minister to friends and minster to neighbors by example and helping when I can.  I would love to do more volunteering but I take care of my husband who can cook for him self and needs help getting up and down, so I'm pretty much at home.  When we have a wedding my Son goes with me and we don't stay so we can get back home.  Its hard I am proud to be a ULC ordained but now that I think about it a minister not in the normal sense LOL.

 

Normal?  The ULC?  Normal?

 

:lol:

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On 9/5/2017 at 1:10 AM, Joyful said:

You have me thinking, a lot, ministry for women is not very accepted, even now.  I officiate but once in while we get a request for my Son, they want a man to officiate.  I minister to friends and minster to neighbors by example and helping when I can.  I would love to do more volunteering but I take care of my husband who can cook for him self and needs help getting up and down, so I'm pretty much at home.  When we have a wedding my Son goes with me and we don't stay so we can get back home.  Its hard I am proud to be a ULC ordained but now that I think about it a minister not in the normal sense LOL.

One of the most influential ministers I have ever had was a lady minister. She was firmly devout in her faith and brought the little church I was a member of together in ways it had not been in decades. I was having a problem with faith (not good in a minister) and she said words that have always stuck with me: "Tlake the talk, be true in what you do, and you will gain the confidence in your faith again so you can walk the walk. She wouldn't let me give up or give in. It is her abiding faith that brought mine back to life.

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keep in mind that my experience is that wiccans and pagens prefer a female officiant and very rarely(outside ones coven)do men officiate.

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On 8/14/2017 at 4:58 AM, Amulet said:

 

The Tee-Up:

Your ordination is life long and doesn't expire. Acknowledgement of your ordination by the church is 24/7. You are also a participating member of the forum and possibly belong to other ULC groups on FB. 

 

I have a few curious questions referencing the above:

 

1. Does the acknowledgment of you being an ordained minister 24/7 mean that you are a full time minister because your ordination counts is acknowledged "always"? Or does the term "full time minister" have a different definition if applied to you, your beliefs and your lifestyle? Is there such a thing in your life as being a minister seasonally? Such as for peak wedding season, and then the rest of the year you make no claims about being a minister and perform no other ministerial duties to speak of?

 

2. Do you consider yourself to be an active minister? What does being an active minister mean for you? Would it mean you actively do "minister things" for a minimum number of hours out of your day or through the week? Does actively participating on the forum or in the ULC groups on FB mean you are an active minister? How regular would doing "minister things" have to be for you to consider yourself active? Is there something specific you think an active minister should be doing?

 

3. Does the church doctrine specifically come up for you as a reference when you have to weigh decisions now and then? For example, if you saw someone drop a $20 bill and they didn't notice and kept going. Or if you are counting calories/fat and had a choice between eating fries or steamed broccoli? I am not talking about conscience or obligation. I mean, do the actual words of the church doctrine "do that which is right" run through your mind in certain cases for making decisions? No? Yes? Sometimes? - Does it come up for you to use the church doctrine as a piece of advice when it applies to a situation? Like, you literally tell or remind someone "do that which is right?" (or even "do the right thing." but you thought of the doctrine.)

 

...No right or wrong answers. I am curious how members define some aspects for themselves as ordained ministers.

I think you confuse the term "minister" with the term "pastor" (or its rough equivalent in whatever religion you happen to deal with.) All are called to full-time ministry. The term "minister" means "to serve" when you study the word's historical roots. However, a "Pastor" is more of a leadership role, which not all can do, and certainly not all can do full time.

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minister:  a member of the clergy.  clergy:  the body of all people ordained for religious duties.  

 

pastor:  a minister in charge of a church or congregation.  

 

so interchangeable terms that mean the same thing...confused how again?

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On 8/14/2017 at 3:58 AM, Amulet said:

 

The Tee-Up:

Your ordination is life long and doesn't expire. Acknowledgement of your ordination by the church is 24/7. You are also a participating member of the forum and possibly belong to other ULC groups on FB. 

 

I have a few curious questions referencing the above:

 

1. Does the acknowledgment of you being an ordained minister 24/7 mean that you are a full time minister because your ordination counts is acknowledged "always"? Or does the term "full time minister" have a different definition if applied to you, your beliefs and your lifestyle? Is there such a thing in your life as being a minister seasonally? Such as for peak wedding season, and then the rest of the year you make no claims about being a minister and perform no other ministerial duties to speak of?

 

2. Do you consider yourself to be an active minister? What does being an active minister mean for you? Would it mean you actively do "minister things" for a minimum number of hours out of your day or through the week? Does actively participating on the forum or in the ULC groups on FB mean you are an active minister? How regular would doing "minister things" have to be for you to consider yourself active? Is there something specific you think an active minister should be doing?

 

3. Does the church doctrine specifically come up for you as a reference when you have to weigh decisions now and then? For example, if you saw someone drop a $20 bill and they didn't notice and kept going. Or if you are counting calories/fat and had a choice between eating fries or steamed broccoli? I am not talking about conscience or obligation. I mean, do the actual words of the church doctrine "do that which is right" run through your mind in certain cases for making decisions? No? Yes? Sometimes? - Does it come up for you to use the church doctrine as a piece of advice when it applies to a situation? Like, you literally tell or remind someone "do that which is right?" (or even "do the right thing." but you thought of the doctrine.)

 

...No right or wrong answers. I am curious how members define some aspects for themselves as ordained ministers.

Hi, Amulet! :)

 

1. Not reeeeallly...I was a Witch long before I was ordained. If the term "minister" is being used in the sense of service, I am always ready to serve, and always have been, since childhood. It's an "I am" vs. "I do" thing. This is why I chose Hearthwitch for a title. :)

 

2. Yes. I do Witchy things pretty much constantly. Discreetly, of course, b/c I am solidly in LDS Country, over here. ;) (Although they have witchcraft of their own, whether they realize it or not.)

 

3. No. And yes. I do use a variant of it, when giving advice- the one that's most commonly known here is "CTR", or "choose the right", thanks to (again) the Mormons- most of the religions around here have some approximation of the same. I do like the ULC's version for use with my kids, though. (It's funny, when you think about it- you can make that suggestion to kids, but when speaking with adults, they take it as an admonishment or criticism if you remind them that they "should" make choices based on what is "right", LOL!) Also, most of the time, when people come to me for assistance, they already know what direction they're going to take, and they already know whether it's wrong (by whatever belief system they have) or not...often, people want someone to just agree that their chosen course of action is the "right" one. 

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