My Grandfather Was A Son Of A Biche'


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PCF Donald K. Smith served in Co L. 399th Regiment, 100th infantry Division, seventh army.

For those looking at the word Biche', no it is not a misspelling.

Its Oct 6th 1944, and my grandfather is leaving the United states headed for the front line in Baccarat, France. During that time the 100th infantry fought a bloody battle on the front lines, loosing many men, but pushing the Germans back. During the 100th's 6 months of combat, 916 men were killed, 3,656 were injured, 180 men went missing. Over 500 men earned silver stars as well as many other metals of honor.

The fortress town of Biche' was a key location that had withstood attacks for 200 years. No one until the 100th arrived, was able to take the city over. Biche' was under siege for 3 winter months, finally falling March 16, 1945.

For the men and women who have given their blood and life for others, I honor them. May they always live on in our hearts.

:usa:

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Great post, SWC. :thumbu:

It saddens (but does not surprise) me, however, that there are no other acknowledgements on this site for Memorial Day. Perhaps an oversight. Perhaps everyone else was too busy to post this holiday weekend whilst laying bar-b-q stained wreaths and flags. Or, perhaps, more and more people have forgetten and take for granted the importance of the sacrafices of so many Americans who have brought or ensured freedom around the world. Or, perhaps, for people who can no longer justify it, or have been taught not to show a hint of it, dare not express patriotism for fear of being labeled.

In memory..... :usa:

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My apologies - as I am in Canada, I do not keep up to date with all the US holidays, although we usually have a similar holiday at the same time.

I hope everyone in the US took a minute or two (at least) to reflect on the sacrifices of all those military personnel who have lost their lives.

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Great stuff, Salem.

I've been to Biche... Nice town.

I'm sure they are glad your Grandfather was there.

Great post, SWC. :thumbu:

It saddens (but does not surprise) me, however, that there are no other acknowledgements on this site for Memorial Day. Perhaps an oversight. Perhaps everyone else was too busy to post this holiday weekend whilst laying bar-b-q stained wreaths and flags. Or, perhaps, more and more people have forgetten and take for granted the importance of the sacrafices of so many Americans who have brought or ensured freedom around the world. Or, perhaps, for people who can no longer justify it, or have been taught not to show a hint of it, dare not express patriotism for fear of being labeled.

In memory..... :usa:

Well, you could have started a thread yrself.

Perhaps an oversight.

There is more on the Off Topic thread, btw.

Edited by Bluecat
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I usually start one but I haven't been here. The military is our family business and way of life. Has been forever. The guys usually tell the kids war stories and we go have a picnic at one of the family members gravesites, and while the kids play frisbee we clean it up and make it look nice. We all tell the kids stories of our travels and exotic places we've been. They come away appreciating the family more as a unit for actually working towards our beliefs in this country and maintaining the family closeness that we see so lacking in many other families that all live in the same geographical area. It helps to give them roots and pride and the knowledge that goodness is a real goal that you must work at your entire life.

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Although I did attend a barbeque, I also stood curbside and saluted with my setter sporting his red, white and blue ribbon as the brave men and women of my father, uncles and grandfather's VFW post marched - (and this year I cried when the Jeep my father always rode in went by)

Even liberal, hippie, pagan chicks know how to give honor and respect where due.

A belated Thank You to those who have served and to their families!

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  • 11 months later...

Its about that time again. So I'm bumping this up. What are your Memorial day plans? My work is going to do a board with everyones relations who were in the military. I'll make something up with Grandpa's picture. I actually don't have any other relation that is/was in the military. My father was too chicken I suppose and Dh didn't pass the health requirements since his knee was crushed in a footback accident. Oh wait, Dh's father was in the military..but since he's a ** I won't bother mentioning him. He only went to avoid jail.

Anyway, maybe I'll buy a new BBQ grill. Yes, that sounds like a good plan. :)

Edited by SalemWitchChild
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Rememberance Sunday in the UK is on the 11th day of the 11th month and there is a special time of silence at 11:00. Canada's is on the same day, as it is a Commonwealth Holiday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day

I usually forget that that the U.S has theirs on a different day. :shy:

Are Poppies significant for you folks?

Edited by Tsukino_Rei
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Rememberance Sunday in the UK is on the 11th day of the 11th month and there is a special time of silence at 11:00. Canada's is on the same day, as it is a Commonwealth Holiday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day

I usually forget that that the U.S has theirs on a different day. :shy:

Are Poppies significant for you folks?

I have bought hundreds of poppies ( paper ones on wire with a little tag ) from the American Legion Auxiliary... and Poppy Day is May 31.....

American Legion

Sal - ute!

Edited by Brother Michael Sky
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Rememberance Sunday in the UK is on the 11th day of the 11th month and there is a special time of silence at 11:00. Canada's is on the same day, as it is a Commonwealth Holiday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day

I usually forget that that the U.S has theirs on a different day. :shy:

Are Poppies significant for you folks?

Yes. They originally represented the blood that was shed on the fields of France (and Flanders?) during "the Great War", but have come to symbolize the sacrifices of all fighting men (and women) in all past wars.

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Yes. They originally represented the blood that was shed on the fields of France (and Flanders?) during "the Great War", but have come to symbolize the sacrifices of all fighting men (and women) in all past wars.

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john-mccrae-in-flanders-fields.htm

Poppies flourished in war torn fields. Imagine fields upon fields of bright red flowers springing up where the blood of so many soldiers had been spilt. John McCrae, a military doctor, was inspired to write the poem "In Flanders Fields".

The GreatWar 1914-1918

In Flanders Fields

by John McCrae, May 1915

Poppies (┬ęgreatwar.co.uk)

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

The poppies referred to in the poem grew in profusion in Flanders in the disturbed earth of the battlefields and cemeteries where war casualties were buried[2] and thus became a symbol of Remembrance Day. The poem is often part of Remembrance Day solemnities in Allied countries which contributed troops to World War I, particularly in countries of the British Empire that did so.

The poem "In Flanders Fields" was written after John McCrae witnessed the death, and presided over the funeral, of a friend, Lt. Alexis Helmer. By most accounts it was written in his notebook[3] and later rejected by McCrae. Ripped out of his notebook, it was rescued by a fellow officer, Francis Alexander Scrimger, and later published in Punch magazine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Flanders_Fields

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