Recommended Posts

Definately Dune. Frank Herbert was a great author. Just the first book, though. God Emperor of Dune was a close second.

Stephen King's "The Dark Tower" series was exceptionally well done, except for the second book (The Drawing of the Three), which I cannot reccomend in good concience, as it was so horrible that I could not finish it.

Enders game.

The Magick of Recluse (I can't recall who wrote it).

The Para-faith war, by L.E. Modesitt Jr.

Terry Goodkind's stuff.

And etcetera. I am an avid science fiction reader. I have read a majority of the books listed here, and enjoyed most of them. I still need to read the last four books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • Replies 96
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I can't remember if anyone mentioned it, but because I'm rereading it I'll throw it out there. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series (I can't remember how many books there are total, six I think) by Douglas Adams is great, funny, witty, though it can make your head ache out of downright strangeness. You have to have at least a passing interest in British comedy to like it though, so if you hate British comedy you shouldn't bother. The movie (if you're one of the six other people besides me who watched it) didn't do it justice.

I loved these books. The only Sci Fi I've really gotten into.

My favorite books of all time are The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan and The Belgariad by Davis Eddings. Fully recommended!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I'll try to add a few not mentioned yet...

The Myth series by Robert Aspirin (but just the first ten books - after that it kinda loses what made it special)

Anything "Star Wars" written by Timothy Zahn, and anything "Star Trek" written by Peter David

and while autobiographies don't really belong here, Bruce Campbell's "If Chins Could Kill" is a worthy read for any fan of his screen work :cool:

Edit to add a series I forgot: Fred Saberhagen's "Sword" series

Edited by ActingUpAgain
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Murp,

I haven't heard them called dragonbard, but they have two base themes, dragon riders as one, dragon songs as another. Then they branch out from there, what do'y think, about 2 dozen books in the series?

I do know that when we've given them to kids the responce in most cases is very positive. They start to read and talk with the "old folks" about the books, story plot, etc.

So maybe we are talking about the same author, just calling the series differently?

Lou

I believe the series discussed is the Dragon Riders of Pern set.... There are like a bazilloon of them. I own about half.

I enjoyed many of the books previously mentioned, but would like to add:

The Shannara Series by Terry Brooks.

I tried to read this set. I got a deal on the hardbound books, so I bought about 95% of the series, but have never gotten past the first one. I found it to be conceptually such an obvious rip off of LOTR that I became bored very fast. I was told that the later books were much better, so I will try to read them if I ever make it through the first one. (I am OCD about having to read book sets in order.)

Now, I have a few suggestions that noone else has made.

1. Familiar Dragon set by Daniel Hood (A Familiar Dragon, Kings Cure, Scales of Justice - Actually 5 stories, but the first three Fanuilh, Wizard's Heir, Beggar's Banquet are often sold as one volume in a book titled A Familiar Dragon)

2. Boudica series by Manda Scott (Actually historical fiction, but has fantasy aspects and is overall a wonderful set of books. I couldn't put them down.)

3. Guardians series by Mary Jo Putney (This is for those who enjoy a little romance novel mixed in with their fantasy.)

4. Unicorn and Pirate series by Tanith Lee (I think these are designed for younger readers. They can get campy at times, but are good for anyone on a lower reading level, or who doesn't have the patience to read long books.)

Thats all I cam think of now, but if you run out of good reads, just ask. I read a lot. (It took me one week to read the entire Harry Potter series...)

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll try to add a few not mentioned yet...

The Myth series by Robert Aspirin (but just the first ten books - after that it kinda loses what made it special)

Anything "Star Wars" written by Timothy Zahn, and anything "Star Trek" written by Peter David

and while autobiographies don't really belong here, Bruce Campbell's "If Chins Could Kill" is a worthy read for any fan of his screen work :cool:

Edit to add a series I forgot: Fred Saberhagen's "Sword" series

I've heard that Peter David's work has dipped in recent years. But Diane Duane ranks up there for Star Trek books, and if you want a laugh-out-loud read, find John Ford's "How Much for Just the Planet".

I agree with you on Zahn, though - and don't miss Steve Perry's "Shadows of the Empire". Perry also wrote the Matador series (excellent), several Conan books, movie novelizations, etc. One of my favorite authors.

The late Janet Kagan wrote one of my favorite Star Trek books, "Uhura's Song", and she wrote another book called "Hellspark" which I re-read the most frequently - 2 or 3 times a year.

There are several other authors on my constant re-read loop, too. Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land", the Ender books already mentioned, the late H. Beam Piper's "Fuzzy" series (look out for a couple of other books written in that universe, too - authors names are Mayhar and Tuning).

I enjoyed the Norton/Lackey "Elvenborn" series - there were supposed to be 4 books, but they only put out 3. I'm a sucker for dragons.....

Speaking of which, Card edited a two-volume anthology called "Dragons of Darkness" and "Dragons of Light". The first told dark tales of dragons, the other were lighter. Funny how that worked. ;) But if you want a completely different take on the legend of St. George, find the latter volume and read Roger Zelazney's story.

Don't discount any of H.G. Wells' books, either. I recently read the original Time Machine story - very unlike the classic movie - and The Invisible Man.

Both of E.E. "Doc" Smith's pulp series - "Lensmen" and "Skylark" aren't bad for what they are - along the same kind of lines as the Burroughs books ("Tarzan" and "John Carter of Mars").

Hope this is helpful.

Peace.

Rev.John

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...
I tried to read this set. I got a deal on the hardbound books, so I bought about 95% of the series, but have never gotten past the first one. I found it to be conceptually such an obvious rip off of LOTR that I became bored very fast. I was told that the later books were much better, so I will try to read them if I ever make it through the first one. (I am OCD about having to read book sets in order.)

I thought the first book was excellent (I hadn't at the time yet read LOTR). I read the second two books but didn't think they were very good.But then again I didn't think that LOTR was any good either. I hate his writing style.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

You know how I am with my kids.....Well we just finished the Artemis Fowl Series by Eoin Colfer they were hooked from book 1. Now the boys want to start reading The Charlie Bone Series by Jenny Nimmo.

Link to post
Share on other sites
You know how I am with my kids.....Well we just finished the Artemis Fowl Series by Eoin Colfer they were hooked from book 1. Now the boys want to start reading The Charlie Bone Series by Jenny Nimmo.

Hey! I'm 41 and I can tell ya, Artemis Fowl STILL rocks! :thumbu:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...

I would strongly recommend "The Illuminati Trilogy" which is actually a single volume authored by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson. The authors take a wide variety of myths, occult arcania and conspiricy theories and weave them together into a very funny, very strange tale. They manage to connect the Kennedy assination to the Lost City of Atlantis. Funny stuff :thumbu:

Gawd, yes! That trilogy blew me away in college and it is one of the few books that I own in multiple editions and printings. It exposed me to Principia Discordia, the Discordian High Holy Book, as well as Discordianism. It probably planted another seed in my subconscious that helped lead me, years later, to become a Freemason. It definitely linked up my love of SF with my 10-year involvement with the Libertarian Party. HIGHLY recommended, though it can be hard to read in spots with stream-of-consciousness writing and many references to esoteric (meaning, hidden) and occult (also meaning hidden) societies, events, philosophies and so forth.

thumbsup%281%29.gifthumbsup%281%29.gifthumbsup%281%29.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone living in (or from) the greater Memphis, Tennessee area, please check out the Darrell Awards website for info on some really good genre books that either feature the area or were written by area authors.

We have been giving out the Darrell Awards for over a decade and amassed quite a list of Winners, First Runners-Up, and Honorable Mentions and/or Finalists and Semi-Finalists in novels, novellas, short stories and, some years, other media categories.

We also have a Hall of Fame for authors who have a body of work at least some of which would qualify for Darrell Award consideration.

If you like to read SF/F/H, please consider joining us as a Reader or a Jury Member. Contact us via the website for details on getting involved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great thread you have going here. I've seen most of my favorite authors mentioned and also several books I have on the shelf waiting to be read. I will list a few authors I didn't notice though.

Carol Berg's Rai-Kirah trilogy and The Bridge of D'Arnath series, great fantasy.

Steve Perry's Matador series, sci-fi with a great martial arts twist.

Stephen Gould's novels are excellent.

Tim Powers is simply one of the most amazing fantasy writers ever, right up there with Neil Gaiman, imho

.

The Thieves World Anthologies are enjoyable, at least through the 6th or 7th.

Jim Butcher's Dresden Files are immense fun.

Neil Stephenson's books are good, though I prefer his earlier cyberpunk books to his System of the World series.

That is about all I can think of for now without simply repeating how much I love authors who have already been mentioned and pointing out other books by them. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

For fantasy and without any doubt whatsoever...

Stephen R Donald's 'Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever' series... brilliantly conceived plot and characters and written with intense skill!

David Eddings - 'Belgariad' series - undeniable classsics!

Raymond E Feist - start with Magician from the 'Riftwar Cycle' series and I promise you won't come back to this reality using willpower alone ;o))

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
  • 9 months later...

Heinlein varies a lot - don't bother with "I will fear no evil". At the good end of the scale I would rate "Double Star", "Citizen of the Galaxy" and "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress"

Hard SF faded for a while, but seems to be slowly recovering. Try Ken McLeod, Timothy Zahn or Alistair Reynolds.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Amulet locked and unpinned this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.