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ManangCam

Prayers To Say For The Dead - Massive Disasters.

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Hi, I"m a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) Division Section Chief. In times of a city wide disaster or a county wide one (Tornados, Earthquakes, etc., etc.) we would be activated to look for survivors. Sometimes we may come upon the dead and dying. So as our Division Chief, and now a Reverend with the ULC, can anyone tell me what type of prayers, I can say to the dead or seriously injured when called to use my skills as a minister?

Rev. Cam

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There are many Catholic prayers for just this purpose.

http://www.medjugorje.com/prayers/prayers-a-novenas-of-the-community/348-three-very-beautiful-prayers-taken-from-the-qpieta-bookq.html

and

http://www.catholic.org/prayers/prayer.php?s=14

It seems that from my experience Catholics are one of the very few Christian groups that actually see this need.

Are you seeking non-Christian prayers as well? I don't want to seem presumptuous.

Edited by RevJohnG

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The Orphic hymn to Asklepios might be suitable for the injured. This is the Apostolos Athanassakis translation:

"Asklepios, lord Paian, healer of all, you charm away the suffering of men in pain.

Come, mighty and soothing, bring health,

And put an end to sickness and the harsh fate of death.

Helper, blessed spirit of growth and blossoming, you ward off evil,

Honored and mighty scion of Phoibos Apollon.

Enemy of disease, whose blameless consort is Hygeia,

Come, O blessed one, as savior, and bring life to a good end."

As far as any Hellenic prayers on behalf of the dead go, that might be tricky. There was a common belief among the Greeks that the majority of the Gods avoided the event of a mortal's death, because the physical act of dying brought with it a type of spiritual pollution, or miasma. In fact, we have evidence that dying on sanctuary grounds was often forbidden. If death did occur on the property of a God, intense ritual purification would have been required to cleanse the taint of miasma from the area.

I suppose one could petition specific death-related deities such as Hermes Psykhopompos or Thanatos on behalf of the recently dead to speed the soul along to the Underworld, but ensuring the soul reach its correct path through the Underworld or appeasing the spirits of the dead would require more than simple prayer. Certain funerary rites such as the preparation of the body, providing a coin for Kharon, pouring khoe libations, and leaving offerings at the grave were thought to aid the dead's journey in the Underworld.

Edited by LeopardBoy

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The Orphic hymn to Asklepios might be suitable for the injured. This is the Apostolos Athanassakis translation:

"Asklepios, lord Paian, healer of all, you charm away the suffering of men in pain.

Come, mighty and soothing, bring health,

And put an end to sickness and the harsh fate of death.

Helper, blessed spirit of growth and blossoming, you ward off evil,

Honored and mighty scion of Phoibos Apollon.

Enemy of disease, whose blameless consort is Hygeia,

Come, O blessed one, as savior, and bring life to a good end."

LOVE this! Lot's of beauty in it.

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I've never quite grasped the concept of praying for the dead? Don't mean to be crude, but what's the purpose? If they're dead, its over, so what's the point? I guess its a 'Last Rites' Catholic tradition?

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Worrying about dead ancestors started long before Christianity, and probably before heaven or hell were conceived. Even now many people live with their dead relatives in their home. People will consult an urn of ashes, a favorite chair, or a picture just as they did their relative in life. Remains kept in the home are either propitiated with wishes of peace, or there is a desire to restrain them from interfering with the living. The concept of deity itself seems to be an amalgam of this natural relationship with the dead, awe and respect for nature, and our propensity to anthropomorphize.

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I would say any prayer for the sick, the dying or the dead would work. If the prayer says something like "Lord protect this soul, guide this soul, heal this individual, etc... pluralize it to change it to souls, individuals, etc...

One can never go wrong with Psalm 23, it seems to be standard fare at funerals, before going into battle (or in the case of rescue personnel going into the flaming building, down into the collapsed mine, etc..., though this is normally said enroute), etc...

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Say a prayer from your heart.

I strongly agree. If in doubt, simply ask the Lord for guidance in your prayer(s) and then open your mouth.

Edited by RevRainbow

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I've never quite grasped the concept of praying for the dead? Don't mean to be crude, but what's the purpose? If they're dead, its over, so what's the point? I guess its a 'Last Rites' Catholic tradition?

These prayers are not just for the dead. They are a means for the living to cope with loss and grief. In much the same way, funerals are also for the benefit of the living. That is the reason that dead bodies are not removed with the trash for disposal.

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I've never quite grasped the concept of praying for the dead? Don't mean to be crude, but what's the purpose? If they're dead, its over, so what's the point?

strange dan,i hear that from atheists.never expected to hear that from you.

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I've never quite grasped the concept of praying for the dead? Don't mean to be crude, but what's the purpose? If they're dead, its over, so what's the point? I guess its a 'Last Rites' Catholic tradition?

Just one more way to comfort the living and help them thru their grieving process.

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Hi, I"m a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) Division Section Chief. In times of a city wide disaster or a county wide one (Tornados, Earthquakes, etc., etc.) we would be activated to look for survivors. Sometimes we may come upon the dead and dying. So as our Division Chief, and now a Reverend with the ULC, can anyone tell me what type of prayers, I can say to the dead or seriously injured when called to use my skills as a minister?

Rev. Cam

Hi Rev. Cam

I purchased thru the ulc seminary site 2 books: Weddings, Funerals and Rites of Passage, and the follow on book: More Weddings...etc...which were very helpful

From this site I purchased the Star Ministers Handbook and a second book that escapes my memory...I believe it's called the Pastors Companion...something like that...all 4 books have sections on prayers for healing and for the dying...

The seminary site books are more nondenominational and interfaith...the Star Minister and Pastors book are Christian in orientation...Hope this helps :)

Peace and Grace be unto You

Rev. Michael

Edited by MTaylor21

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