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Legality Of Ulc In Netherlands

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One of our members on FaceBook who has moved to the Netherlands is having difficulty finding out about her legality to marry others as a ULC member there. Language difficulties and people with no idea of the concept of ULC are hampering her attempts at getting any answers.

If anyone here has any info or could direct her to a source where she could find answers any response would be appreciated. Thank You!

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One of our members on FaceBook who has moved to the Netherlands is having difficulty finding out about her legality to marry others as a ULC member there. Language difficulties and people with no idea of the concept of ULC are hampering her attempts at getting any answers.

If anyone here has any info or could direct her to a source where she could find answers any response would be appreciated. Thank You!

http://www.helplinelaw.com/law/netherlands/marriage/marriage.php

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This is also one of the problems with the UK . In the states the Town Hall holds the records. Therefore ministers can be recognised easier as they are not required to store the records. In the UK a recognise registra holds the records within a building like a church and it must be available for the public to view. A UK minister is not automatically a recognised registra.

Being as we in the UK have to have property and become a registra we are hit with a double whammy with regard to being recognised as ULC ministers and carrying out marriages.

This said there is nothing to stop a person after the legal aspects are done elsewhere from doing a blessing ceremony on the marriage but this would not be a legal requirement or have in its self legal standing. The question is does anyone ask for this?

As for recognising one as a minister I would say the EU Human rights covers thse in Holland as much as it does us in the UK:-

Article 9: Freedom of thought, conscience and religion

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching practice and observance.

2. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.

This right has a special significance under the Human Rights Act. Section 13 of the Act requires courts or tribunals, when they are hearing cases which may impact on the exercise of this right by a religious organisation, to have ‘particular regard to the importance of that right’.

Article 10: Freedom of expression

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right shall include freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without inference by public authority and regardless of frontiers. This Article shall not prevent States from requiring the licensing of broadcasting, television or cinema enterprises.

2. The exercise of these freedoms, since it carries with it duties and responsibilities, may be subject to such formalities, conditions, restrictions or penalties as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society, in the interests of national security, territorial disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, for the protection of the reputation or rights of others, for preventing the disclosure of information received in confidence, or for maintaining the authority and impartiality of the judiciary.

http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/human-rights/what-are-human-rights/the-human-rights-act/

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