ChristLight

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About ChristLight

  • Rank
    I AM Lin
  • Birthday January 22

Helpful Information

  • Title, Name/Nickname
    Lin
  • Gender
    Female
  • Marital Status
    married to the most wonderful man in the world
  • Location
    Blooming where I am planted

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  • Interests
    Life, art, painting, music, guitar, flowers, gardening, beach combing, star gazing
  • Grateful For
    Life, Love, Jesus and the Good God Above
  • Your Motto
    With God, all things are possible.
  • Doctrine /Affiliation
    Christian, with an understanding of people's Interfaith journey

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  • Occupation
    Enlightenment Ministry ~ Christian ~ Online ~ Worldwide
  • Website URL
    https://enlightenmentministriesrevlindahourihan.wordpress.co

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    @ShamballaLin

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    linhourihan@yahoo.com

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  1. ChristLight

    Hi again

    So glad you are back. May God bless you and your ministry. You have a lot to share.
  2. Love your motto! Wisdom dispelling ignorance.

  3. After a long break, I am back. I am looking to reconnect with past friends and find new friends here in the ULC. I welcome all new ministers here in the ULC. Since we are interfaith, I am hoping to add friends and communicate with people of all beliefs. I am so thankful for the ULC. It is the perfect place to connect with others, continue education, share experiences, and in the process possibly be of help to others.

  4. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    That's OK. Since then, I have posted another couple posts on the Secret Book Of James, which I divided into two parts. I should also post them here in the ULC forum. They are also on my website: https://enlightenmentministriesrevlindahourihan.wordpress.com/. Let me get them on the forum too.
  5. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    I can understand that. My next thought addresses your first question, of one covenant or two. Lately I have been studying the Nag Hammadi Scriptures, many of which describe that initially God first created Jesus, being love, and Sophia, being wisdom, and that all the rest of Creation was to be made through them, from love and wisdom together. But Sophia creates on her own and creates Yaldaboath, who then creates 7 archon. Yaldaboath then looks around and seeing no other greater than himself, stands up and says, "I am the lord they God ..." and proceeds with how all creation is to revere him. It never says he was evil, but Sophia, seeing the snake-like form that he was "like an aborted fetus," casts him down to earth. Yaldaboath was created out of wisdom, without love, these books say. It goes on to say that Yaldaboath created humans. The Good God of heaven, Father of Jesus, then had compassion on us humans, after being created and having to deal with the fallen angels of Genesis 6 fame, and sends Jesus to show us the better way we should live, so that we could become adopted sons and daughters of the Good God of heaven. If this is the case, that we were made from there good seed of Sophia, but with the bad seed of Yaldaboath, I could understand why Jesus would be sent to us, as the new covenant. It also makes much more sense that we are the field sown with both good and bad seed. This thought, new to my thinking, if it is at all true, makes much more sense to me, how the God of the Old Testament is such a blood thirsty God, requiring numerous animal sacrifices, and sanctioning the death of every man, woman and child in the numerous cities he wants conquered. I have always wondered, "Wasn't there one innocent eight year old girl in Sodom and Gomorrah, or any of the other lands conquered? Were one hundred percent of the cities and towns conquered with any redeeming people in them?" More and more I am reading the things Jesus said in a new light. I have also been researching different Bibles, because I notice that some of the newer translations actually change the intent of the verse. Take Luke 17:20-22 for example. The newer translations say that "the kingdom of God is among you." But the older translations like the Tyndall translations, the King James version, and the Holy Bible from Aramaic with the George Lamsa translation, as well as the Interlinear Bible with Hebrew, Greek and English says that "the kingdom of God is within us." That is an entirely different thing. I keep seeking because so much, like the Nag Hammadi Scriptures for so long were hidden from us. I think this sheds new light on the topic of one covenant or two.
  6. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    I have been looking very closely at all of this, and the promises and threats from the "God" of the Old Testament. More and More I see that Jesus in John 8:44 really meant what he said, when Jesus specifically says his Father is not our Father, that our father is the devil and the father of lies. I can better understand, that God, the Father of Jesus had compassion on us, because he IS Love, and not a vengeful god. No wonder we have to go through Jesus to get to the God of LOVE.
  7. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    I know. For this very reason, I have been taking a much deeper look at which "God" is saying this. I seems that the "God" of the Old Testament is not a very loving "God," but a violent and blood thirsty "God." This is making me take a better look at the Nag Hammadi Scriptures, when they say that we were not made by God the Father of Jesus, but by Yaldaboath, who was made out of wisdom, but not love. I dismissed this years ago when I first heard it. But then I came across John 8:44, where Jesus specifically says that his Father is not our father, that our father is the devil and the father of lies. Interesting.
  8. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    The first thing that comes to mind is when God says he will never again send a flood to kill all mankind. Could that be considered a covenant, a promise between God and man?
  9. ChristLight

    Comparative Religion Discourse 1

    Thanks Mark.
  10. I have just finished the first lesson in the Comparative Religion (Part 1) Class, taught by Rev. Kythera Ann. My first order of business was to go out and restock my library, since I had passed some books on to others over time. The Dead Sea Scrolls give so much insight to YHWH, revealing vital information not includes in mainstream Bible's. I dove into the I Ch'ing, since I do not have any foundation on Chinese belief systems. I have studied at length the Japanese and Reiki energy systems. Today I found practical use for the Interlinear Bible (Hebrew/Greek/English), which then sent me to Strong's Expanded Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, in order that I could make my point on the ULC Forum backed up by relevant research. I enjoyed learning about the Philosophy of Religion, which touches on logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ontology, ethics and aesthetics. I would also add cosmology to this list. This sent me to Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Metaphysics deals with fundamental nature of reality and being, which includes epistemology, ontology, and cosmology. WHAT??? So here you go: 1) Epistemology is the study or a theory of nature and grounds of knowledge especially with reference to its limits and validity. 2) Ontology is the abstract, philosophical study of what is outside objective experience, which is steered philosophy away from metaphysics, and toward the disciplines of natural science and linguistics. (This definition is from TIME) The rest of that list I knew, logic, ethics and aesthetics. This lesson also had me list the many different religious and metaphysical services around in my area. I made this list, with names, addresses and phone numbers. I am to visit these once per month during this course. As an interesting side note here, when I moved to a new town in a new state in my retirement, I did exactly this, and visited all the churches in my new area to see what was being taught from the pulpits. I was amazed at the services, from the sublime to the (shall I say) ridiculous. This is about an 8 month course. It should be interesting to see if I can get all this reading, studying commenting and assignments done in a timely manner. I also appreciated learning who added what to the various beliefs about God; 26 well known people from Xenophanes and Plato to Radhakrishnan and Borodin. From here, the lesson goes in to the Old Torah, Hebrew as a sacred language (not modern Hebrew) and based on ideographic glyphs similarly applied to sacred texts in Egyptian, Sanskrit, Greek, Runes (Runes!?), Chinese and several other languages. I learned that Hebrew as no vowels (which I knew), since vowels are considered "G-d's breath, therefore giving life to the "Word" (which I did not know). The section explaining Hebrew glyphs, letters and numbers, was almost lost on me. For example, "In the beginning" would look like "BRAShYTv" (Beth, Reich, Aleph, Shin, Yod, Tav) or 2, 200, 1, 300, 10, 400. Each one of those numbers/letters has concepts associated with it. I at least get the concept, but got lost in the detail, until it was explained, and even then. Through the use of numbers, correlated to letters, and including the use of will and individuality; choice including principle, law and duality; harmony including family, spirit and understanding; and lastly, building including form and responsibility; we can better understand these letters and numbers. What I could relate to here was her conclusion about the meaning of "In the beginning," after she broke it down using these numbers and explanations. She explained that in this example, that perhaps embedded within creation, within each one of us, is the ability to become complete, to truly realize our Spiritual inheritance. And all that from those first few words, "In the beginning." I think I am still at the beginning, even though I have been at this for years.
  11. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    More to the point of this initial topic of One Covenant or Two, I checked out The Interlinear Bible (Hebrew-Greek-English), which sent me to Strong's Expanded Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible. It is true that the Hebrew word "kohen" means one officiating, a priest, or one acting as priest, as Zamber aptly points out that even pagans had their priests who served their gods, as intermediaries between their god and the people. This concordance says that the Jewish priestly role began in the days of Moses (commonly referred to as the Old Covenant). Jesus (known as the New Covenant) says he came to fulfill the Law (Old Covenant) not destroy it. This an interesting question.
  12. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    Upon reflection, I do know a bit about the Pharisees and Sadducees. The following is my understanding of the Pharisees and the Sadducees. PHARISEES The Pharisees were a prominent sect of Judaism existing in the first century C.E. According to some scholars, the name literally means "Separated Ones; Separatists," referring perhaps to avoidance of ceremonial uncleanness or to separation from Gentiles. Just when the Pharisees had their beginning is not preciously known. The writings of the Jewish historian Josephus indicate that in the time of John Hyrcanus I (latter half of the second century B.C.E.) the Pharisees already formed an influential body. Josephus wrote, "And so great is their influence with the masses that even when they speak against a king or high priest, they immediately gain credence." - Jewish Antiquities, XIII, 288 (x,5) Josephus also provides details of the Pharisees. He observed, "They believe that their souls have the power to survive death and that there are rewards and punishments under the earth for those who have lived lives of virtue or vice: eternal imprisonment is the lot of the evil souls, while the good souls receive an easy passage to a new life." - Jewish Antiquities, XVIII, 14 [I,3]) "Every soul, they maintain, is imperishable, but the soul of the good alone passes into another body, while the souls of the wicked suffer eternal punishment." Regarding their ideas about fate or providence, Josephus reports, "(They) attribute everything to fate or to God; they hold that to that act rightly or otherwise rests, indeed, for the most part with men, but that in each action Fate cooperates." - The Jewish War, II, 162, 163 (viii, 14). The Christian Greek Scriptures reveal that the Pharisees fasted twice each week, titled scrupulously (Matthew 9:14; Mark 2:18; Luke 5:33; 11:42; 18:11,12.), and did not agree with the Sadducees in saying that "there is neither resurrection nor angel nor spirit within us, but the Pharisees believe in all of these." (Acts 23:8) The Pharisees prided themselves on being righteous (actually self-righteous) and looked down on the common people. (Luke 18:11,12; Job 7:47-49). To impress others with their righteousness, the Pharisees broadened the scripture - containing cases that they wore as safeguards and they enlarged the fringes of their garments. (Matthew 23:5). They loved money (Luke 16:14) and desired prominence and flattering titles. (Matthew 23:6, 7; Luke11:43). The Pharisees were so biased in their application of the Law that they made it burdensome for the people, insisting that it be observed according to their concepts and traditions. (Matthew 23:4) They completely lost sight of the important matters, namely, justice, mercy, faithfulness, and love of God. (Matthew 23:23; Luke 11:41-44) The Pharisees went to great lengths in making proselytes. (Matthew 23:15) The main issues over which they contended was with Christ. Jesus involved Sabbath observance (Matthew 12:1, 2; Mark 2:23, 24; Luke 6:1,2), adherence to tradition (Matthew 15:1, 2; Mark 7:1-5), and association with sinners and tax collectors (Matthew 9:11; Mark 2:16; Luke 5:30). The Pharisees apparently thought that refinement resulted from association with persons who did not observe the Law according to their view of it. (Luke 7:36-39) Therefore, when Christ Jesus associated and even ate with sinners and tax collectors, this prompted them to object. (Luke15:1,2) The Pharisees found fault with Jesus and his disciples because of their not practicing the traditional washing of hands. (Matthew 15:1, 2; Mark 7:1-5; Luke 11:37, 38) But Jesus exposed their wrong reasoning and showed them to be violators of God's law on account of their adherence to man-made traditions. (Matthew 15:3-11; Mark 78:6-15; Luke 11:39-44) Rather than rejoicing and glorifying God in connection with the miraculous cures performed by Christ Jesus on the Sabbath, the Pharisees were filled with rage over what they deemed a violation of the Sabbath law and therefore plotted to kill Jesus. (Matthew 12:9-14; Mark 3:1-6; Luke 6:7-11; 14:1-6) To a blind man whom Jesus had cured on the Sabbath, they said concerning Jesus, "This is not a man from God, because he does not observe the Sabbath." (John 9:16) The attitude the Pharisees displayed showed that they were not righteous and clean inside. (Matthew 5:20; 23:26) Like the rest of the Jews, they were in need of repentance. (Compare Matthew 3:7, 8; Luke 7:30) But the majority of them preferred to remain spiritually blind (John 9:40) and intensified their opposition to the Son of God. (Matthew 21:45, 46;; John 7:32; 11:43-53, 57) There were Pharisees who falsely accused Jesus of expelling demons by means of the ruler of the demons. (Matthew 9:34; 12:24) and of being a false witness. (John 8:13) Certain Pharisees tried to intimidate the Son of God (Luke 13:31), demanded that he display a sign to them (Matthew 12:38; 16:1; Mark 8:11), endeavored to trap him in his speech (Matthew 22:15; Mark 12:13; Luke 11:53, 54), and otherwise tried to test him by questioning. (Matthew 19:3; 22:34-36; Mark 10:2; Luke 17:20) Jesus finally silenced their questioning by asking them how it would be possible for David's lord also to be David's son. (Matthew 22:41-46) The mob that later seizes Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane included Pharisees (John 18:3-5, 12, 13), and Pharisees were among those who requested that Pilate secure Jesus' tomb so that the body could not be stolen. (Matthew 27:62, 64) During the earthly ministry of Christ Jesus, the Pharisees exerted such great influence that prominent persons were afraid to confess him openly. (John 12:42, 43) One of such fearful ones evidently was Nicodemus, himself a Pharisee. (John 3:1-2; 7:47-52; 19:39) There may also have been Pharisees who later became Christians. For example, the Pharisee Gamaliel counseled against interfering with the work of Christians (Acts 5:34-39), and the Pharisee Saul (Paul) of Tarsus, became an apostle of Jesus Christ. (Acts 26:5; Philippians 3:5) SADDUCEES The Sadducees were a prominent religious sect of Judaism associated with the priesthood. (Acts 5:17) They did not believe in either resurrection or angels. (Acts 23:8) The precise time for the emergence of the Sadducees as a religious sect is not known. First, historical mention of them by name appears in the writings of Josephus, which indicate that they opposed the Pharisees in the latter half of the second century B.C.E. Jewish Antiquities, XIII, 293 [x. 6] Josephus also provides information about their teachings. However, there is a question as to whether his presentation is completely factual. Unlike the Pharisees, Josephus says the Sadducees denied the workings of fate, maintaining that an individual, by his own actions, was solely responsible for what befell him. Jewish Antiquities, XIII, 172, 173 [v.9] They rejected the many oral traditions observed by the Pharisees and also Pharisaic belief in the immortality of the soul and in punishments or rewards after death. In their dealings with one another, the Sadducees were somewhat rough. They were said to be disputatious. According to Josephus , their teachings appealed to the wealthy. Jewish Antiquities, XIII, 298 (x, 6); XVIII, 16, 17 (I, 4); The Jewish War, II, 162,-166 (viii, 14) As pointed out by John the Baptized, the Sadducees needed to produce fruits befitting repentance. This was because they, like the Pharisees, had failed to keep God's Law. (Matthew 3:7, 8) Christ Jesus himself compared their corrupting teaching to leaven. (Matthew 16:6, 11, 12) With reference to their religious beliefs, Acts 23:8 states, "Sadducees say there is neither resurrection, nor angel nor spirit, but the Pharisees publicly declare them all." It was in connection with the resurrection that the brother-in-law marriage that a group of Sadducees attempted to stump Christ Jesus. But he silenced them. By referring to the writings of Moses, which the Sadducees professed to accept, Jesus disproved their contention that there is no resurrection. (Matthew 22:23-34; Mark 12:18-27; Luke 20:27-40) Later, the apostle Paul, went before the Sanhedrin, divided that highest Jewish court by playing the Pharisees against the Sadducees. This was possible because of the religious differences existing between them. (Acts 23:6-10) Although religiously divided, Sadducees joined Pharisees in trying to tempt Jesus by asking him for a sign. (Matthew 16:1), and both groups were united in their opposition to him. Biblical evidence indicates that the Sadducees took a leading part in seeking Jesus' death. Sadducees were members of the Sanhedrin, which court plotted against Jesus and later, condemned him to death. Included in the court where Chiapas, the Sadducee and high priest,, and evidently also other prominent priests. (Matthew 26:59-66; John 11:47-53; Acts 5:17, 21) Therefore, whenever the Christian Greek Scriptures speak of certain action as being taken by the high priests, Sadducees were evidently involved. (Matthew 21:45, 46; 26:3, 4, 62-64; 28:11, 12; John 7:32) Sadducees appear to have taken the lead in trying to stop the spread of Christianity after Jesus' death and resurrection. (Acts 4:1-23; 5:17-42; 9:14)
  13. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    Hello RabbiO ~ You are absolutely correct, except you are giving me too much credit. What I presently know of the Pharisees and the Sadducees would fit on the head of the pin, which is vastly more than what a thimble holds. I am currently studying in the Seminary, the course, Comparative Religions. I am only on week 1. I know I have much to learn. What I know about the Jewish religion is what my Christian upbringing has provided me, which is precious little about the Pharisees and Sadducees. Part of my homework for this course is to visit other religions which I know little about. Connecting with a Rabbi and visiting a Jewish Temple is on my to do list. But I see I need even more education. I want to know the Jewish faith from a Jewish stand point, not from a Christian one. This course suggested for me to get a lot of books. Presently I am diving into the I Ch'ing, which seems to be one of the oldest works of literature. A am open to study all works helpful to my spiritual growth, both so I can better understand what each religion teaches, as well as help someone in that faith. Thank you for your comment. I'd be interested in your understanding of the Pharisees and the Sadducees.
  14. ChristLight

    What do you do...?

    I find my beliefs come from experiencing different beliefs first hand. I seem to investigate beliefs deeply to see if it feels right for me. For example I had a deeply rooted Catholic upbringing and continued with extensive studies and teaching Catholic doctrine. Then I went to a New Age School to learn what they knew. I think I must been the student from hell though, as I sat in my first Reiki class, with my arms and ankles folded. They asked how I was doing. I told them I was here to learn Reiki, not to have them mess with my theology. Shows you what I knew then. Still I wanted to learn about other belief systems. I couldn't help but notice that I was in classes with every type of Christian, Buddhist, atheist, and beliefs I could not identify at that school. After that I got so into New Age everything. I did find allowing myself to change my religious practices painful at first. There was this uncomfortable period of time. I wondered if it was it safe to do this. But even thought I was scared, I continued on, because that was the only way to move forward. For me, having learned so much about so many religions, I find going back to being Christian makes the most sense for me. However, it think Catholics have it wrong. I think I liked the feeling of spiritual nostalgia. When I retired, I went to every church in my hometown area to see what they were doing. Some ministers still yell and demean their congregations. Some danced in the isles, and sold items right inside the church. The Catholic ones were arrogant. So here I am, back again, back in the ULC Seminary and back to my online ministry. To your questions, I think so much of this is semantics. After studying different religions for years, I find that sometimes we call the same thing, like God, by different names, like a multi-faceted diamond. It is all one diamond with many different reflections. I realize that some religions do not believe in God at all. That's different. No judgment here, just different. Currently I am studying the apocryphal books: The Books of Enoch, and the many books included in the Nag Hammadi Scriptures, which got thrown out, from what I can tell, because they didn't like that they told how we humans were created partly with the good seed of the Good God of heaven, Father of Jesus; and partly with the seed of a fallen creation, Yaldaboath. I think in 300-400 ad, the Church Fathers combined the evil God and the Good God together, so that now people worship the fallen God without even knowing that. Even Jesus tried telling the people of his time this fact in John 8:44 when he says his Father is not our Father, that our father is the devil. It is one thing if people choose to worship Satan, but I think well meaning Christians ought to know what really happened. Still, I do fell the struggle with the spiritual growth process. It is not how any of us believe what happened, happened. What actually happened, happened. I do want to get this right. I think it matters.
  15. ChristLight

    One covenant, or two?

    I am late to this conversation, if that is OK. But I am here. I have learned that when Jesus came, he came as the fulfillment of all Old Testament prophecies, and fulfilled the letter of the law, as well as to teach what was called the New Way, which was also simply called, "The Way." Jesus came to teach the heart of the law, with love, empathy and compassion, which was something new to both the Sadducees and the Pharisees. Jesus taught that it was OK to heal on the Sabbath, to eat by plucking grain and eating it, etch. It is at least the Christian view that if you keep the Golden Rule laws, you do in fact keep all of the Ten Commandments. Now for a new thought. Have you read the Secret Book of John among six other Nag Hammadi scriptures? They tell of the Father of Jesus not being the father of humans. They explain how humans are half of the good seed from the Good God of heaven, and half of the bad seed of a fallen angel. Even Jesus said, in the traditional Bible in John 8:44, that his father is not our father, that our father is the devil. Later when Jesus gives the parable of the good seed and the bad seed in the farmer's field, he says that the wheat and the weeds should grow together, so the wheat does not get lost. Think of it. If we are made of both good and bad seed DNA, we would not survive if that were to be split apart. So we must choose in this life whether to choose good or choose bad in life. This evil fallen angel, written about in the Nag Hammadi scriptures, says we called the one who created us, God. Yet this "God" was of a fallen nature, egotistical in nature. When he first realized his own being, he stood up and said, "I am the Lord they God. There is none before me." This is the "God" who wipes out city after city in the Old Testament, killing every man, woman and child. It is this "God" who demanded the Ten Commandments, with severe penalties to all who disobeyed. Does this sound like an all loving God?