HIGH TECH MEDITATION


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Hello. I have been meditating for 46 years a couple of hours a day, sometimes more. (You can too if you cut back television to near zero) I have taught many people to meditate. Americans are difficult as their attention span is very short and their powers of concentration are below average. I have found a way for Americans to successfully meditate without need of an attention spam or concentration. High tech meditation is the ideal solution for such Americans who become easily discouraged and who lose heart fairly quickly when difficulty presents itself. These meditation soundtracks employ binaural beats and/or isochronic tones to alter the brainwaves of the listener. Meditative states that would normally take years of practice to access can now be accessed instantly. One can choose alpha (light meditation), theta (deeper, corresponds to dream sleep), and delta (deepest, corresponds to dreamless sleep). One may also use these soundtracks to deepen and advance ones natural meditation as well. Use a soundtrack for a few days or weeks and see how ones natural meditation is enhanced. Many companies manufacture these soundtracks but the best I have found are here:

EQUISYNC


https://eocinstitute.org/meditation/Order_Equisync/

There are others such as the Synchronicity Foundation and Centerpointe Research Institute but the Equisync soundtracks are by far the most advanced. They incorporate all of the advances in this technology (and there are many). The others are limited to binaural beats or isochronic tones or both. They work well but the Equisync soundtracks work even better.

Namaste,
Nathaniel
aka Venerable Lantian Xinshen
Hongaku Jodo
Train online with Hongaku Jodo for the authentic Buddhist priesthood with Lineage from Buddha Heart Association.
https://www.hongaku.net/

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There is no substitute for adulthood, discipline, and perseverance either. If you become a teacher of meditation and experience first hand what Americans are like you will likely understand. I teach Zazen. It is difficult and requires discipline, concentration, perseverance. I have found it very helpful to encourage the faltering fading student with these soundtracks. Using one they experience what meditation can be. It renews their resolve. The soundtracks are like a pacifier, a binky. They are to be outgrown and then real meditation alone is practiced without the help of a soundtrack. Tell me about your meditation practice. Zazen? Vipassana? TM? (LOL I am kidding about the TM)

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen

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13 hours ago, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

There is no substitute for breath work.

No one said there is. These soundtracks do not prevent anyone from practicing their normal mode of meditation while using them. They encourage and strengthen the faltering student as well as make natural meditation easier and deeper and more impactful. Once these goals are accomplished the soundtracks are abandoned and the student has leapfrogged years in their development. That is the proper use of these soundtracks.

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Nathaniel said:

There is no substitute for adulthood, discipline, and perseverance either. If you become a teacher of meditation and experience first hand what Americans are like you will likely understand. I teach Zazen. It is difficult and requires discipline, concentration, perseverance. I have found it very helpful to encourage the faltering fading student with these soundtracks. Using one they experience what meditation can be. It renews their resolve. The soundtracks are like a pacifier, a binky. They are to be outgrown and then real meditation alone is practiced without the help of a soundtrack. Tell me about your meditation practice. Zazen? Vipassana? TM? (LOL I am kidding about the TM)

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen

 

 

Since you asked, I am certified to teach Dr. Lam's Tai Chi for Arthritis system.  It is modified Sun Tai Chi with qi gong.  I teach (volunteer) at two senior centers.  My personal practice is more diverse.  If you care, I can go into more detail.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Nathaniel said:

Thank you. Good work.

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen

 

 

Thank you.  As you say, people are impatient, with short attention spans.  I'm working on helping my students cultivate patience.  It's the times.  People want everything fast.

 

:mellow:

 

An addendum.  Zazen is an austere, difficult path.  I'm impressed.

 

:mellow:

 

 

Edited by Jonathan H. B. Lobl
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Hello Jonathan. Thank you very much for the compliment. You describe Zazen very truthfully. I confess my ignorance of Tai Chi and Qi Gong although I am doing something to fill that gigantic hole. I have discovered how delightful and insightful the Tao Te Ching is as well as Chuang Tzu. Amazing insights! Much of the Buddhadharma can be found in Taosim, in seed form, as you already know.

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen/Brother Nathaniel

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4 hours ago, Nathaniel said:

Hello Jonathan. Thank you very much for the compliment. You describe Zazen very truthfully. I confess my ignorance of Tai Chi and Qi Gong although I am doing something to fill that gigantic hole. I have discovered how delightful and insightful the Tao Te Ching is as well as Chuang Tzu. Amazing insights! Much of the Buddhadharma can be found in Taosim, in seed form, as you already know.

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen/Brother Nathaniel

 

 

Don't overlook the I Ching.  The Book of Change.  It has good insights into the nature of reality.  In over simplified terms -- the harmonizing of opposite forces, into dynamic balance.  Much of it is beyond me.  The little that I do get is impressive.  

 

:mellow:

 

 

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4 hours ago, Nathaniel said:

I have used an online version of the I Ching at https://www.ichingonline.net/

It has always been spot-on and is not at all like other forms of divination. It's the only such tool I have ever recommended. And yes, it is very impressive.

 

 

The I Ching casts light on modern physics.

  • What is nothing?  It turns out that nothing is something and has greater than zero mass.  More, nothing is unstable and is full of quantum fluctuations.
  • What is it that keeps the galaxies from flying apart?  That speck of darkness at the center.  We call that speck of darkness -- a super massive black hole.  We have all seen the Yin Yang symbol.  There is a speck of darkness in the light.  There is a speck of light in the darkness.  It keeps things stable.
  • What happens inside a black hole?  Space collapses.  Time stops.  What happens in the space between galactic clusters?  Space expands.

 

The I Ching teaches us that when something is all Yin -- it becomes unstable and turns into Yang.  Also that when something is all Yang -- it becomes unstable and turns into Yin.

 

Not bad, for over 5,000 years ago.

 

:mellow:

 

 

 

Edited by Jonathan H. B. Lobl
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Hello Jonathan. Yes, that's pretty good for 5,000 years ago! I recall reading, more than once, The Tao of Physics shortly after it was published. I have since read one or two others with a similar theme. Around the same time I read The Tao of Pooh which was quite good and entertaining. The sequel, The Te of Piglet, was a disappointment. Way way off topic, I see you live in Jackson Heights in Queens. When I was a boy there was a TV show called Car 54 Where Are You. The theme song (which is still stuck in my mind after six decades) went like this:

There's a holdup in the Bronx
Brooklyn's broken out in fights
There's a traffic jam in Harlem
that's backed up to Jackson heights
There's a scout troop short a child
Kruschev's due at Idyllwild...
Car 54 where are you?

Idyllwild eventually became John F. Kennedy airport. and Kruschev was the Soviet Union premiere at the time. The one who beat his shoe on a table at the U.N. and declared "We will bury you." Now the Soviet Union is long gone.

Namaste,
BN

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1 hour ago, Nathaniel said:

Hello Jonathan. Yes, that's pretty good for 5,000 years ago! I recall reading, more than once, The Tao of Physics shortly after it was published. I have since read one or two others with a similar theme. Around the same time I read The Tao of Pooh which was quite good and entertaining. The sequel, The Te of Piglet, was a disappointment. Way way off topic, I see you live in Jackson Heights in Queens. When I was a boy there was a TV show called Car 54 Where Are You. The theme song (which is still stuck in my mind after six decades) went like this:

There's a holdup in the Bronx
Brooklyn's broken out in fights
There's a traffic jam in Harlem
that's backed up to Jackson heights
There's a scout troop short a child
Kruschev's due at Idyllwild...
Car 54 where are you?

Idyllwild eventually became John F. Kennedy airport. and Kruschev was the Soviet Union premiere at the time. The one who beat his shoe on a table at the U.N. and declared "We will bury you." Now the Soviet Union is long gone.

Namaste,
BN

 

 

 

Things change.

 

On a completely different note, I have a Zen question.  Something I read years ago.  I don't remember where.  It quotes a Zen monk.  "I know I'm already an enlightened master.  Why am I still miserable?"

 

Years later, I'm still thinking about that.  Please comment.

 

 

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On 3/13/2020 at 7:20 PM, Nathaniel said:

Hello Jonathan. Thank you very much for the compliment. You describe Zazen very truthfully. I confess my ignorance of Tai Chi and Qi Gong although I am doing something to fill that gigantic hole. I have discovered how delightful and insightful the Tao Te Ching is as well as Chuang Tzu. Amazing insights! Much of the Buddhadharma can be found in Taosim, in seed form, as you already know.

Namaste,
Venerable Lantian Xinshen/Brother Nathaniel

 

 

My favorite line from the Tai Te Ching comes from the first poem.

 

"The Tao that can be named, is not the eternal Tao."

 

I love that.

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To know something is not the same, at all, as to Realize something. The monk knew, as an abstract intellectual fact rattling around in his head, that he is already enlightened. But he had no Realization of that fact. When one realizes this it grips one and ones citta is then rooted and grounded in this Realization. Endorphins come and go, moods change, but the Realization remains. This is the same as the Advaita Vedanta saying, "Ordinary mind is enlightenment." I posted a link to you yesterday that, 15 years ago, my first book was published, and it is now out of print. Since you have posted many facts about the Bible, I thought you would like it but the post with the link has been removed. The book is titled Jehovah Unmasked and is available as a free PDF. (You can find the book itself on Amazon. Used copies are going for over four thousand dollars) If you Google "Jehovah Unmasked" the very first listing at the top, Aeon Byte, is the best link for this PDF. 

Also, have a look at the Derek Lin translation of the TTC. It is by far the best. Derek is fluent in both Mandarin and English and he is a Taoist with great knowledge, understanding, and insight. If you Google it you will find websites that explain his superior methodology, his superior translation principles, explained.

The Tao that can be Taoed is not the eternal Tao. (not Dereks translation but a literal one nonetheless)

Namaste,
BN

Edited by Nathaniel
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4 hours ago, Nathaniel said:

To know something is not the same, at all, as to Realize something. The monk knew, as an abstract intellectual fact rattling around in his head, that he is already enlightened. But he had no Realization of that fact. When one realizes this it grips one and ones citta is then rooted and grounded in this Realization. Endorphins come and go, moods change, but the Realization remains. This is the same as the Advaita Vedanta saying, "Ordinary mind is enlightenment." I posted a link to you yesterday that, 15 years ago, my first book was published, and it is now out of print. Since you have posted many facts about the Bible, I thought you would like it but the post with the link has been removed. The book is titled Jehovah Unmasked and is available as a free PDF. (You can find the book itself on Amazon. Used copies are going for over four thousand dollars) If you Google "Jehovah Unmasked" the very first listing at the top, Aeon Byte, is the best link for this PDF. 

Also, have a look at the Derek Lin translation of the TTC. It is by far the best. Derek is fluent in both Mandarin and English and he is a Taoist with great knowledge, understanding, and insight. If you Google it you will find websites that explain his superior methodology, his superior translation principles, explained.

The Tao that can be Taoed is not the eternal Tao. (not Dereks translation but a literal one nonetheless)

Namaste,
BN

 

 

 

Alright.  That makes sense.  It also describes me.

 

:mellow:

 

 

 

 

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One of my favorite Buddhist quotes, comes from Kadem Morton.  A monk in a Tibetan lineage.

 

"The gods are illusory.  But if we ask them for assistance, they will help us anyway."

 

 

:whist:

 

It's similar to a "joke" told by secular Jews.

 

"There is no God, and we are his people."

 

:mellow:

 

 

 

 

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