smblkc

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About smblkc

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  • Marital Status
    Living with the woman I love, Lisa.
  • Location
    Cincinnati, OH

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  • Interests
    I share the same basic joys as my children: sleeping, eating, making messes and causing trouble. Did I mention that my children are bulldogs?
  • Doctrine /Affiliation
    Humanistic Judaism, Agnostic, Church of Universal Collaboration

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  • Website URL
    http://www.hstassoc.net

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  1. A very well put post. I must admit that I do agree with a lot of your points in this post as well. Granted, I haven't the faintest clue about Sithism, I will say that there are some statements made in the original post that I also firmly believe.
  2. You're probably right.... So be it
  3. I just feel that not everything can be cut and dry. What is a subjective opinion to most others (such as the statement of someone saying that he or she is a "good person") is, in fact, the truth to the person who genuinely believes that opinion of him or herself. It would be so much easier if we had a scientific way to measure every aspect and have a control to compare to. But, this is just impossible. I liken it to this, as well: If you have ever had to testify before a magistrate or other judicial body, you may have been required to swear that you will "tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." The unfortunate fact is that you can only testify to the truth as you know it to be. This is a concept known as "basic truthfulness." You are not perjuring yourself for as long as you tell the truth in the way that you honestly and genuinely know it as. In order to be found guilty of perjury, two key conditions must be met. First is that their was a false statement. Second is that the person making it knew that the statement was false. The whole point to that last paragraph is that "truth" is what we make of it. I do believe that ignorance does play a huge role in what the "truth" is. However, by definition, "truth" is "a judgment, proposition, or idea that is true or accepted as true." Therefore, I, like the U.S. court system (when operated in an ethical manner), do I believe that "truth" is based more on the culpability of a person. I also believe that there must be an important distinction between "truth" and "fact." In my previous example, I may believe that I am a good person, and this may very well be true. However, there may be someone out there with some type of evidence that shows that I mug children of their candy on every Halloween, and always park in handicapped spots just to watch those with placards get mad. The "fact" is that this would generally make me not a very good person, but doesn't change the "truth" of my opinion of myself. I hope that this makes sense
  4. Not necessarily, in my opinion. There are truths out there which remain "true" to specific individuals despite of what you and I know or think. Are we wrong, or are they? Even with things such as "truth" and "honesty" there are areas which aren't completely absolute. What may be a truth to me could be just an opinion to you. For instance, if I were to say "I am a good person," there is no way that any one can say that this opinion is not a true statement to me. You and the rest of the world may and would probably disagree, but if I hold my statement as "true" and honestly believe that it is,then to me it's true. Therefore, I believe that truth is transparent, and depends on what lies beneath to "show color". Again, this is all my interpretation of it, as I believe that certain concepts can't always be "categorized" or "color coded", and are more subjective than others believe.
  5. I'm going to agree with this statement. Ultimately, "truth" is only as true as the depth of our knowledge. Sometimes, what we have always held as true is indeed revealed to not be. I personally believe that "truth" is therefore transparent.
  6. Welcome to the boards! There are numerous people of numerous beliefs here, so feel as though you are amongst friends here.....
  7. One of my favorite guitars that I ever had was actually a Yamaha 120SD. It was a natural finish telecaster style that played as well as any high end guitar that I've played. I loved that guitar, but I had to trade it in when my bass rig blew up. It was the only instrument that I could do without since I'm primarily a bassist (and now drummer). I hate tremelo systems, period!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Give me a tune-a-matic bridge and I'm quite satisfied.
  8. Wouldn't mind having a Dot or Dot Studio myself. I have always liked epiphone archtops. I had a Washburn hollowbody that had a great feel to it... if it weren't for UPS smashing the heck out of the neck during shipping. While playable, I couldn't bear the idea of paying so much for a broken guitar and sent it back. I decided that I won't buy anything like that through the catalogs again.
  9. Ibanez... I have been playing an ATK100 4 string for about 13 years.... love it to death. I have also been partial to certain Yamahas (instruments and amps) as well.
  10. Good day, everyone! I am brand new to the forums, and just received the "official" email stating that I have been recorded in the church records today. I must admit that I have never in a million years had ever thought that I would actually become ordained. Frankly, I am Jewish (I refer to it as "by pride and not faith," meaning that I am proud of my heritage but I am essentially agnostic in belief). The reasons that I became ordained is, as a lot of others here, fairly unique. The first reason, frankly, is because I wanted to show my significant other that we can indeed be ordained and that there are organizations that will accept us. To clarify, my significant other, Lisa, is Wiccan. While I have stumbled upon quite a bit of anti-Semitism in my fairly short life thus far, she has had to endure ridicule from those more narrow-minded than we would like. As a note, she, too, has just received her ordination confirmation, and hopes to put it to good use as she progresses in the medical field and as she begins working in the hospice environment Secondly, I do have friends of various backgrounds - straight, gay, Catholic, Christian, Muslim and, of course, Wiccan - and that I feel that an ordainment that doesn't require me to necessarily choose sides, so to speak, may prove beneficial to their spiritual well-being or needs. I might be off course for thinking that, as it may prove difficult since I am not spiritual. But, maybe through this experience, I will develop a sense of spirituality that suits me. It is my belief that, regardless of whether I agree with an individual's religion or not, he or she has the inalienable right to practice it. The fact that ULC and, I would assume, a good bulk (or hopefully all) of the other ordained members readily accept this philosophy as well is very refreshing. Lastly, as a former EMT, police officer and service disabled state security officer, I have protected the safety and physical well-being of countless individuals. Now I might be able to help someone on some different level. Sorry for being long-winded. Stephen