The Future of Artificial Intelligence


Recommended Posts

The future of Artificial Intelligence.

 

This is a complex and subtle subject.  It should have it's own thread.  At least one.  I would like to begin with a simple thought.  When true general A.I.arrives -- and it is self aware -- I suspect it won't be religious.

 

Will we even know it, when we see it?

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
  • 3 months later...
On 2/15/2021 at 7:13 AM, tuoesg said:

I think Ii is already everywhere, on social networks, in eye of horus slot games and in absolutely everything. 
It is a unique human ability to adapt. Some professions will go away, but others will emerge in their place. Some will not be able to adapt, but on the whole, I think humanity is in no danger. The AI revolution will create more jobs than it destroys.
 

 

 

Perhaps, but how many truck drivers or accountants will qualify to fill them?     

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
On 7/12/2021 at 8:36 AM, Ferrion said:

This is a complex issue

 

 

There are many who seem to be the wise and calming voice of reason.  Who insist that the new tech will create more jobs than it destroys.  The thing is -- how many of these people are themselves looking for a job?

 

We are rushing head on into an unemployment disaster.  If you wanted a career oriented major in school -- what course of study would you even pick?  Remember.  Jobs that require people to do them -- but not a physical presence -- are going to get outsourced.  Repetitive jobs of all types will be automated.

 

No matter how we dice it, the future is in a lot of trouble.  The new tech is adapting faster than the work force.  This is what has changed.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2021 at 2:40 AM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

 

 

There are many who seem to be the wise and calming voice of reason.  Who insist that the new tech will create more jobs than it destroys.  The thing is -- how many of these people are themselves looking for a job?

 

We are rushing head on into an unemployment disaster.  If you wanted a career oriented major in school -- what course of study would you even pick?  Remember.  Jobs that require people to do them -- but not a physical presence -- are going to get outsourced.  Repetitive jobs of all types will be automated.

 

No matter how we dice it, the future is in a lot of trouble.  The new tech is adapting faster than the work force.  This is what has changed.

 

 

 

Or... we start taxing assets/profits more (instead of work) and introduce 'universal basic income' ASAP...

 

:coffee:

 

PS. and I am not "looking for a job" myself, nor afraid of being unemployed or without income myself...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RevBogovac said:

 

 

Or... we start taxing assets/profits more (instead of work) and introduce 'universal basic income' ASAP...

 

:coffee:

 

PS. and I am not "looking for a job" myself, nor afraid of being unemployed or without income myself...

 

 

It's amazing how the tax codes and other laws seem to favor the wealthy.  Almost as though there were a causal relationship.

 

:sigh2:

 

The UBI could actually happen.  Capitalism needs customers who can pay for stuff.  The UBI could replace much of the social safety net.  It would cost less and be easier to administer.

 

Something has to give.  I never thought I would see cashier jobs vanishing.

 

:umbrella:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

 

 

Apple Will Scan All iPhones for Illegal Child Abuse Images, Sparking Privacy Debate
 
Replay
Mute
 
Current Time 2:11
/
Duration 2:11
Loaded: 100.00%
 
 
 
1x
Playback Rate
auto
Fullscreen
Seek back 10 seconds
Seek forward 10 seconds
Youmaker_player_logo.svg

Apple announced Thursday is it planning to scan all iPhones in the United States for child abuse imagery, raising alarm among security experts who said the plan could allow the firm to surveil tens of millions of personal devices for unrelated reasons.

In a blog post, the company confirmed reports saying that new scanning technology is part of a suite of child protection programs that would “evolve and expand.” It will be rolled out as part of iOS 15, which is scheduled for release sometime in August.

Apple, which has often touted itself as a company that promises to safeguard users’ right to privacy, appeared to try and preempt privacy concerns by saying that the software will enhance those protections by avoiding the need to carry out widespread image scanning on its cloud servers.

“This innovative new technology allows Apple to provide valuable and actionable information to [the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children] and law enforcement regarding the proliferation of known CSAM,” said the company, referring to an acronym for child sexual abuse material. “And it does so while providing significant privacy benefits over existing techniques since Apple only learns about users’ photos if they have a collection of known CSAM in their iCloud Photos account. Even in these cases, Apple only learns about images that match known CSAM.”

The Cupertino-based tech giant said the system will utilize breakthrough cryptography technology and artificial intelligence to find abuse material when it is stored in iCloud Photos, said the firm in its blog post. The images will be matched to a known database of illegal images, the firm said, adding that if a certain number of those images are uploaded to iCloud Photos, the company will review them.

Those images—if they’re deemed illegal—will be reported to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The software won’t be applied to videos, Apple added.

ntd-logo-comment.png
SIGN UP FOR NTD DAILY
What you need to know, summarized in one email.
Stay informed with accurate news you can trust.
 
By registering for the newsletter, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

“Apple’s expanded protection for children is a game-changer,” John Clark, the president and CEO of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said in a statement on Thursday about the initiative. “The reality is that privacy and child protection can coexist.“

But some security experts and researchers, who stressed they support efforts to combat child abuse, said the program could present significant privacy concerns.

Ross Anderson, professor of security engineering at the University of Cambridge, described Apple’s proposed system as “an absolutely appalling idea,” according to the Financial Times. “It is going to lead to distributed bulk surveillance of … our phones and laptops,” he remarked.

When news of the proposal broke on Wednesday evening, John Hopkins University professor and cryptographer Matthew Green echoed those concerns.

“This sort of tool can be a boon for finding child pornography in people’s phones,” Green wrote on Twitter. “But imagine what it could do in the hands of an authoritarian government?”

Green said that “if you believe Apple won’t allow these tools to be misused [crossed fingers emoji] there’s still a lot to be concerned about,” noting that such “systems rely on a database of ‘problematic media hashes’ that you, as a consumer, can’t review.”

The expert told The Associated Press that he’s concerned Apple could be pressured by other, more authoritarian governments to scan for other types of information.

Microsoft created photoDNA to assist companies in identifying child sexual abuse images on the internet, while Facebook and Google have implemented systems to flag and review possibly illegal content.

The Epoch Times has contacted Apple for comment.

From The Epoch Times

 
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Chinese Regime Has Stolen Enough Data to Compile ‘Dossier’ on All Americans: Official
Chinese Regime Has Stolen Enough Data to Compile ‘Dossier’ on All Americans: Official Part of the Chinese Communist Party's army of "internet trolls" in an undated leaked photo, in Fangzheng County, Harbin City, China. (NTD)

A former U.S. national security official warned that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is stealing data to compile a “dossier” on every American adult and may use coercive means to influence private citizens and political leaders.

During a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing this week, former Trump deputy national security adviser Matthew Pottinger said the CCP has stolen Americans’ sensitive data via illicit methods, including cyber theft and hacking.

“Assembling dossiers on people has always been a feature of Leninist regimes, but Beijing’s penetration of digital networks worldwide, including using 5G networks … has really taken this to a new level,” Pottinger said, referring to former Soviet dictator Vladimir Lenin.

With the information the CCP has obtained, he said, it “now compiles dossiers on millions of foreign citizens around the world, using the material that it gathers to influence, target, intimidate, reward, blackmail, flatter, humiliate, and ultimately divide and conquer.”

Going a step further, Pottinger sounded the alarm that “Beijing’s stolen sensitive data is sufficient to build a dossier on every single American adult and on many of our children too, who are fair game under Beijing’s rules of political warfare.”

Deputy National Security Advisor Matthew Pottinger Deputy National Security Advisor Matthew Pottinger arrives for a Medal of Honor ceremony for Sergeant Major Thomas P. Payne, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry in the East Room of the White House in Washington, on Sept. 11, 2020. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
ntd-logo-comment.png
SIGN UP FOR NTD DAILY
What you need to know, summarized in one email.
Stay informed with accurate news you can trust.
 
By registering for the newsletter, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

For years, the CCP has engaged in campaigns to steal U.S. intellectual property and technology secrets in a bid to militarily and geopolitically gain an advantage over the West.

The regime has also carried out significant hacks against private entities, including last month’s alleged cyberattack against Microsoft—which the United States and its allies blamed on the Chinese Ministry of State Security. In addition, four Chinese nationals were charged by the Department of Justice over a number of separate cyber intrusions that targeted corporate and research secrets.

During the hearing, the former director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center, William Evanina, said that the CCP is using a “whole of country approach” to “leverage, infiltrate, influence, and steal from every corner of U.S. success.”

“It is estimated,” Evanina warned, “that 80 percent of American adults have had all of their personal data stolen by the CCP, and the other 20 percent most of their personal data.”

Furthermore, he said that the Chinese regime poses an “existential threat” to the United States and is employing “complex, pernicious, strategic, and aggressive” tactics to accomplish its goals.

William Evanina of NCSC William Evanina, nominee to be director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center testifies during a hearing held by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence in Washington on May 15, 2018. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Chinese regime is even working to illegally obtain data to create artificial intelligence, research, and development programs to bolster its military and economic goals.

After the recent cyberattacks, Biden administration officials offered sharp criticism against Beijing’s state-sponsored hacks, including intellectual property theft. But the critical words were not accompanied by any punitive actions including diplomatic expulsions or sanctions against the regime.

Separately, Pottinger also warned about the CCP’s so-called “United Front” efforts to spread propaganda and influence decision-makers around the world and within the United States.

“The CCP’s 95 million members are all required to participate in the system, which has many different branches. The United Front Work Department alone, which is just one branch, has three times as many cadres as the U.S. State Department has foreign service officers,” he noted.

From The Epoch Times

 
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.