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revwayne62

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I am also reading The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks. It really bothers me, because thus far, all I see is a rip off of The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien.

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That was one of the first fantasy novels I ever read. I thought it was great. The sequels sucked, so don't bother with them. He was ripping of Tolkein, but I didn't know it at the time (and quite frankly don't like Tolkein).

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I've read them both. Didn't notice though ....

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Green Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson

These books are slooooow but for some reason I want to finish the series  :huh:

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I just finished The Years of Rice and Salt by him. Same thing, slow but I just had to finish it.

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A very small, very old (1949)time worn loose-leaf (means brown pages are falling out)...."Seeds of Contemplation," by Thomas Merton. Have started over at the beginning several times and won't go anywhere without it. Even thought to write it out by hand so as to etch it in my brain.

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I'm working on Battlefield Earth by L Ron Hubbard. Good book. Anyone seen the movie? All I want to know is is it was any good.

Personally, I found the (Sylvester Stallone?) movie disappointing and too short to really cover much of the story. Also, the single book "Battlefield Earth" was a little bit disappointing, I believe both the TV show and the Battlefield Earth book were based on a single volume of the Mission Earth stories, but it's been so long since I read them, I'm not sure. HOWEVER!!!: The "Mission Earth" (10 volume series) by L. Ron Hubbard was addictive! I couldn't stop reading them. I had to go to 4 different libraries and check out 3 volumes at a time to go through them all without stopping (each time I got to third volume, I'd return the first two and check out the next two in sequence.)

Lots of action and you just kept wanting more and more. Probably the second best space opera after e.e. 'doc' smith's Lensman series (which has blessedly been reprinted by the book firm Old Earth Books in Baltimore Maryland). Caution: the Mission Earth series books I found in the library system were all hardbacks about the size of the Thorndike-Barnhardt high school dictionary and there's 10 of them to wade through.

I've finished reading Jack Chalker's Well World series and now I'm mostly playing the PC game "Syberia" and reading some Andre Norton books in between to give my mouse-hand a rest to avoid repetitive motion syndrome. Since Syberia is more of a thinking puzzle game with a very nice story line, than a shoot-em-up (there is NO shooting in this game), I can play it for hours without strain. No reflexes required! I'm definitely going to also buy Syberia 2 which just came out. Both games and free demos for each are available from www.gamestop.com . The free demos give a good idea of the feel for the game play. Beautiful graphics work and excellent sound/music effects in both games. If you even played Myst, this is much better and also has game characters who must be interacted with in order to solve the riddles and proceed through the story line/game.

p.s. - for anybody worried about it - the Mission Earth sci-fi books have NOTHING to do with Dianetics written by the same author.

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Read The Green Rider by Kristen Britian last week and am reading the sequel, First Rider's Call right now. It's nothing special, but the local library has a small fantasy section. :P

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I just finished Goro Adachi's book "Time Rivers". He makes a strong case for intelligently designed river systems that produce valid historical time lines. You can get a taste of his theories on his website.

I am about to start a book called "Human Devolution"

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I just finished Goro Adachi's book "Time Rivers".  He makes a strong case for intelligently designed river systems that produce valid historical time lines.  You can get a taste of his theories on his website. 

I am about to start a book called "Human Devolution"

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Bill, Time River seems an interesting book, it amazes me how people can go back in time and get such details.

A few weeks ago I heard that folks here at Harvard were talking about changing the direction of the Charles River, at first I thought it was a joke, but was assured that its not a joke its for real.

Have you ever heard of rivers being tampered with other than sand bagging.? :wacko:

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I just finished Goro Adachi's book "Time Rivers".  He makes a strong case for intelligently designed river systems that produce valid historical time lines.  You can get a taste of his theories on his website. 

I am about to start a book called "Human Devolution"

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Bill, Time River seems an interesting book, it amazes me how people can go back in time and get such details.

A few weeks ago I heard that folks here at Harvard were talking about changing the direction of the Charles River, at first I thought it was a joke, but was assured that its not a joke its for real.

Have you ever heard of rivers being tampered with other than sand bagging.? :wacko:

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No, but I know the Mississsippi changed direction for a while because of an earthquake.

Goro didn't go back in time, he correlated the features of the rivers with past history, Egyptian mythology, Greek Mythology, and astronomy creating a time line for the rivers. The Mississippi is the time river for the US, and if Goro is right, then time is up for us. Of course that doesn't mean the end of the US, but it may mean the end of the US being the New World. Mars is set to become the New World and the New Frontier within the very near future.

Finished with Time Rivers, and now starting Human Devolution by Michael Cremo; the alternate history of the human race.

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Just started Stalin, the Court of the Red Tsar, by Simon Sebag Montefiore

It's extremely good.

I've never met the author, but many many years ago he stole my girl.

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Reunion-NJO

Green Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson

These books are slooooow but for some reason I want to finish the series  :huh:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I just finished The Years of Rice and Salt by him. Same thing, slow but I just had to finish it.

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How is that? It sounds interesting.

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Just finished Rider's First Call and am off to the library to find something new...

Edited to add an "n" to make "ad" into "and"

Edited by Nooncaster

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Picked up Requiem for the Sun by Elizabeth Haydon. I read her Rhapsody Trilogy a couple of years ago and this book is a follow up to that trilogy.

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A Secret Atlas

I just started this last weekend. I'm almost done. Normally it doesn't take this long to read one of Stackpole's books, but it was a bit difficult to get into.

I've read a handful of his books and they're all good reads. He wrote a bunch of Battletech books which I've never touched, but I've read all his Star Wars books.

Michael Stackpole's website

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:nerd:

Molecules of Emotion by Candace Pert, Ph.D.

Candace Pert homepage

I'm finding it a great read and fascinating.

I just finished: The Biology of Belief by Bruce Lipton, Ph.D.

Offical Bruce Lipton homepage

Also a great read and compelling me to learn a LOT more about cellular physiology. Both of these are fairly technical but still accessible for the lay reader.

:smart:

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