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drewj

Wiccan Bible

55 posts in this topic

I just googled The Book of Shadows, checked wiki, and went to several sources selling the book.... it seems (to me) that it's accepted by it's users as a practical guide to the practice of their beliefs.... just because it doesn't have the words "WICCAN BIBLE" printed on the cover, doesn't mean it isn't used as such.

Just a quick search on Amazon will show you many books with the title Book of Shadows. Some are useful knowledge, some are not. They are not considered "sacred" like the christian bible is. They are simply information.

Each Wiccan will usually keep a personal BOS, either in written or electronic form, often both. I personally have a written BOS, though most of my rituals are written on loose paper and burned at the end of the ritual, so my BOS is actually pretty damn thin. lol I have a picture of it on my blog if you want to see. http://salemwitchchild.blogspot.com/2012/08/our-bos-isis.html

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A phone call seems to put a bit of clarity on the "Book of Shadows", for me anyway.

One of my Wiccan friends said the "The Gardnerarian Book of Shadows" is held by many modern Wicca as the "guide book" for their basic set of beliefs and practices. Each witch or warlock would also have a "My" Shadows (not necessarily named or titled) book that they are responsible for putting in their personal versions of spells, reading formulas and insights about the craft.

This is the same light as within my circle in the "Galdor's Book" (The "Calling" or "Read"). Runic followers may have several resources for traditional "Rune Works", but then we each have our own journals for keeping our scrying formularies, particularly insightful readings, rune formulas and so forth. The whole thing, as I've known it, is that both Wicca and Runic followers are continually growing and enlightening their craefts, once a person is beyond the "initiate" level, all witches, warlocks, vitkis etc. (as pertains to each path) are part of the evolution of their chosen works.

Hopefully Salem or one of our other practicing Wicca can help inform us better about this. I trust my friend's summation, but he too is such a private practitioner that he may not be in touch with the majority view held by others within Wicca.

Blessings Be,

You have the general right idea. One thing though, its usually considered an insult to call a male witch Warlock. Warlock means oathbreaker. He would simply be called a witch or male witch.

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I would think a Book of Shadows should contain Shadows?

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You have the general right idea. One thing though, its usually considered an insult to call a male witch Warlock. Warlock means oathbreaker. He would simply be called a witch or male witch.

why not a wizard?

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why not a wizard?

a wizard is a totally different type of practioner?

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I would think a Book of Shadows should contain Shadows?

They do; shadows of thoughts.

You have the general right idea. One thing though, its usually considered an insult to call a male witch Warlock. Warlock means oathbreaker. He would simply be called a witch or male witch.

why not a wizard?

a wizard is a totally different type of practioner?

Both Witch and Wizard come from similar root words. Wicce or Wicca essentially means "wise one", and that's what Witch is; "One who is wise". Wizard comes from "wizened", which means wise. They are generally used for two different practices of mystical arts. Not all Wiccans are Witches. Not all Witches practice Wicca. But they are usually used synomonously. Wizard usually refers to european hermetic magic, typically from 19th century spiritualism, though its been used for centuries before. I agree with SalemWitchChild; Warlock is insulting. I don't break my oaths. I keep my promises.

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A wizard is an entertainer imo.

Now, here I would disagree with you. As I stated earlier, Wizard often refers to hermetic magic done by 19th century european spiritualists. However, MAGICIAN is nothing more than an entertainer, a practitioner of the subtle arts of the Mountebank. I have some experience on that front, as stage magic and close-up illusion is a hobby of mine.

Of course, this is just IMHO, just like your statement.

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Now, here I would disagree with you. As I stated earlier, Wizard often refers to hermetic magic done by 19th century european spiritualists. However, MAGICIAN is nothing more than an entertainer, a practitioner of the subtle arts of the Mountebank. I have some experience on that front, as stage magic and close-up illusion is a hobby of mine.

Of course, this is just IMHO, just like your statement.

I'm aware others don't share my opinion, which is why I added the "Imo" part. Just like some see the word "magic" as the entertainment magic, and "magick" as spiritual work. I personally use magick in relation to spiritual practice.

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I just had to call Scott again this morning and apologize for my poor manners. After reading what you said Salem I really felt bad about using "warlock" for the many years I've known him, both in his presence and not as well as a general term for male witches. Only once did I ever get a negative response from someone, a complete stranger, but I never knew why until this topic came up.

So far, everyone is correct.

war-lock; a male witch

[from the Middle English warloghe, from Old English waeligmac.gifrloga, oath-breaker : waeligmac.gifr, pledge; see wemacr.gifrschwa.gif-o- in Indo-European roots + -loga, liar (from lemacr.gifogan, to lie; see leugh- in Indo-European roots)

Scott put my heart at ease "It's a title I wear gladly".

As he went into the history it seemed to me to make sense and not a "bad thing" per se for those choosing that path. Around the 6/7th century CE, those who did not embrace the church were charged with the "crime" of waer loghe or 'breaking the solemn oath to God and church' (remember the Apostle's Creed?) one of the many things the early church could claim "heresy" and condemn people to death.

I now understand why there would be a split decision on the use of the term 'warlock', however, I can also see why there are those who would use the title with dignity and pride. This is just one more reason I personally think it's so important for people to take an interest in their own family and beliefs history.... so they know the why's and how's of their chosen paths.

Thanks Salem and drewj and everyone...were it not for this topic it may have been several more months before there was occasion to call my old friend! (b-day is July and usual phone call)

Blessings of Peace,

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Both Witch and Wizard come from similar root words. Wicce or Wicca essentially means "wise one", and that's what Witch is; "One who is wise". Wizard comes from "wizened", which means wise. They are generally used for two different practices of mystical arts. Not all Wiccans are Witches. Not all Witches practice Wicca. But they are usually used synomonously. Wizard usually refers to european hermetic magic, typically from 19th century spiritualism, though its been used for centuries before. I agree with SalemWitchChild; Warlock is insulting. I don't break my oaths. I keep my promises.

wizen (v.)

Old English wisnian, weosnian "to wither," cognate with Old Norse visna, Old High German wesanen "to dry up, shrivel, wither;" German verwesen "to decay, rot." Related: Wizened.

wizard (n.)

mid-15c., "philosopher, sage," from Middle English wys "wise"

witch (n.)

Old English wicce "female magician, sorceress," fem. of Old English wicca "sorcerer, wizard, man who practices witchcraft or magic," from verb wiccian "to practice witchcraft"

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There is a minority movement within the witchcraft community to reclaim the use of the title Warlock for male witches, but at the moment it's a minor movement and controversial.

Oberon Zell Ravenheart, a prominent pagan, self identifies as a 'Wizard'. I'm a student at his Grey School. http://www.greyschool.com/

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I thought wizards were balloonists from Omaha. :jest:

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Thank you, RabbiO, I misswrote. Thanks for setting me straight.

I thought wizards were balloonists from Omaha. :jest:

"OH, we're off to see the Wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz. WE hear he is a wonderful wiz if ever a wiz there was. If ever a wonderful wiz there was, the Wizard of Oz is one because, because, because, because, because..........because of the wonderful things he does."

Oh, If I only had a brain..........

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I'm aware others don't share my opinion, which is why I added the "Imo" part. Just like some see the word "magic" as the entertainment magic, and "magick" as spiritual work. I personally use magick in relation to spiritual practice.

I feel I must apologize to you, Salem. I did not intend to insult or anything. I was only stating my own opinion, but I think I may have just come off as Jack-assy, rather than "friendly disagreement" as was my intention. So, again, I apologize, nothing negative was meant by it.

Sometimes, things would be so much easier in person, where we can see each other's face and non-verbal cues..........

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I just had to call Scott again this morning and apologize for my poor manners. After reading what you said Salem I really felt bad about using "warlock" for the many years I've known him, both in his presence and not as well as a general term for male witches. Only once did I ever get a negative response from someone, a complete stranger, but I never knew why until this topic came up.

So far, everyone is correct.

war-lock; a male witch

[from the Middle English warloghe, from Old English waeligmac.gifrloga, oath-breaker : waeligmac.gifr, pledge; see wemacr.gifrschwa.gif-o- in Indo-European roots + -loga, liar (from lemacr.gifogan, to lie; see leugh- in Indo-European roots)

Scott put my heart at ease "It's a title I wear gladly".

As he went into the history it seemed to me to make sense and not a "bad thing" per se for those choosing that path. Around the 6/7th century CE, those who did not embrace the church were charged with the "crime" of waer loghe or 'breaking the solemn oath to God and church' (remember the Apostle's Creed?) one of the many things the early church could claim "heresy" and condemn people to death.

I now understand why there would be a split decision on the use of the term 'warlock', however, I can also see why there are those who would use the title with dignity and pride. This is just one more reason I personally think it's so important for people to take an interest in their own family and beliefs history.... so they know the why's and how's of their chosen paths.

Thanks Salem and drewj and everyone...were it not for this topic it may have been several more months before there was occasion to call my old friend! (b-day is July and usual phone call)

Blessings of Peace,

I've been meaning to add vitki that warlock may not be negative. While the old english oath breaker is a possible source of the word there is also Vardlokkur in old norse which may be a possible source of the term and most translate it as. It means one who fetters or binds and I believe may also have connections with seid. It has to do with warding away evil spirits and fettering or binding them.

Vardlokkur - ON: One who opens and closes fetters and locks. Man with the power of binding spirits using runes, calls and knot-magic, a "warlock". Also the runes used for defense.

http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/gods3.html#V

Also in Scots language warlock would translate as a cunning man.

Edited by Stormbringer

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I believe as Stormbringer mentioned that to some "warlock" would not be negative or offensive, myself included. I have also heard of these alternative origins for the word. Of course, I am a Traditional Witch and not a Wiccan. I prefer the Welsh term "gwyddon" which can be tranlsated as witch (male), wizard, scientist, or philosopher, but warlock wouldn't offend me unless it was meant by the person using the term to be disparaging.

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BTW, speaking of different terms, in Traditional Witchcraft we have a notebook or journal similar to a personal Book of Shadows, but it is usually called a grimoire (after the ceremonial magick texts) :).

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As a male witch, i can say, i have only ever called my self a Witch. now within a more country style practice. one can be called a Wizard or a wise one/cunning man. We have no sacred texts as we are a faith that doesnt need them. Also the Book Of Shadows are a ritualized text as well most of the important parts are oral trasmitions. 

alot of the old world cunning folk would use the Grimoirs and high magic books for those who could read/write.

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