maj11381

Doctor Of Philosophy In Religion From Ulc

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On 6/26/2017 at 11:20 AM, Key said:

Only for self satisfaction of accomplishing something. LOL

 

In what way is this an accomplishment?  

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On 6/26/2017 at 3:57 PM, Brother Kaman said:

I have a doctorate in metephysics. I have been known to register at hotels as Brother Kaman, PhD and once or twice as Rev. Kaman.

 

On 6/27/2017 at 5:22 AM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

In my experience, on those rare occasions when I was addressed as Reverend -- I knew I was going to be asked for money.

 

I have the Honorary D.D. and the Metaphysics degree.  I've never been tempted to use either of them in any way.

 

I was wondering if anybody had actually used their ULC degree for anything.  Ever.  

But this is how I use it. I am amazed at how many people don't know what metephysics is.

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1 hour ago, Brother Kaman said:

 

But this is how I use it. I am amazed at how many people don't know what metephysics is.

 

Alright.  Do you get a better room than otherwise?  Better service?  Better price?  

 

I'm not pushing.  Just asking.  

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13 hours ago, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

 

In what way is this an accomplishment?  

Pay the good will offering, read the material, then pass the test. Isn't that the accomplishment the degrees acknowledge, if nothing else?

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11 hours ago, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

 

Alright.  Do you get a better room than otherwise?  Better service?  Better price?  

 

I'm not pushing.  Just asking.  

Actually, Dr. of Metephysics doesn't bring me much beyond a strange look but signing as Reverend does seem to deliver a certain unearned respect.

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4 hours ago, Brother Kaman said:

Actually, Dr. of Metephysics doesn't bring me much beyond a strange look but signing as Reverend does seem to deliver a certain unearned respect.

 

Sometimes, it does.  Strange, isn't it?  

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On 6/30/2017 at 9:34 AM, Key said:

Pay the good will offering, read the material, then pass the test. Isn't that the accomplishment the degrees acknowledge, if nothing else?

 

I have a real B.A.  It was a torment and an ordeal.  

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On 7/1/2017 at 5:47 PM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

It was a torment and an ordeal.  

So were my kidney stones. That doesnt make them worth having, nor does it mean I am a better person for having gone through the experience. 

 

My uncle earned an MBA some thirty years ago, but he has never used it. He plays piano professionally, and currently tours the world with a cruise-line act.

He poured a ton of money and effort into his degree, because he had been taught that he needed it- that he would end up a failure without it. In hindsight, he wishes he had spent his resources elsewhere. According to him, the only useful things he learned were how to do his own accounting... and that he hates accounting enough to pay someone else to do it for him.

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I had a cleaning job once. It was a spray bottle, rags, mops, etc. labor intensive sort of cleaning. The guy working with me was always bragging about having a college degree. After a while I grew tired of it and said, "they must have grandfathered me in because I do the same work and only have a high school education." That shut him up. Even so, I am proud that I m have two children with college degrees. Neither are working cleaning jobs.

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14 hours ago, mererdog said:

So were my kidney stones. That doesnt make them worth having, nor does it mean I am a better person for having gone through the experience. 

 

My uncle earned an MBA some thirty years ago, but he has never used it. He plays piano professionally, and currently tours the world with a cruise-line act.

He poured a ton of money and effort into his degree, because he had been taught that he needed it- that he would end up a failure without it. In hindsight, he wishes he had spent his resources elsewhere. According to him, the only useful things he learned were how to do his own accounting... and that he hates accounting enough to pay someone else to do it for him.

 

I never said that getting my B.A. made me a better person.  It didn't.  Only that getting it was a prolonged agony.  

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While I saw at the time the value in furthering my education and obtaining a beyond an Associates Degree, I also didn't want to be selfish in allowing my folks to have to take out a second mortgage to pay for it. I felt they paid and gave me so much already.

Life has also taught me more than I knew then. So, while I regret not getting a "real" higher degree, I don't the toll it would have taken upon others, and upon myself.

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On 7/4/2017 at 4:05 AM, Key said:

While I saw at the time the value in furthering my education and obtaining a beyond an Associates Degree, I also didn't want to be selfish in allowing my folks to have to take out a second mortgage to pay for it. I felt they paid and gave me so much already.

Life has also taught me more than I knew then. So, while I regret not getting a "real" higher degree, I don't the toll it would have taken upon others, and upon myself.

 

I think it was Mark Twain -- or Will Rodgers -- who said -- "Never let your education get in the way of your learning."

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On 7/3/2017 at 10:47 PM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

I never said that getting my B.A. made me a better person.  It didn't.  Only that getting it was a prolonged agony.  

You seemed to be implying that your "real B.A." was more of an "accomplishment" than a ULC degree, because it was harder to get. I was implying that difficulty is not a true measure of accomplishment. 

Edited by mererdog

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3 hours ago, mererdog said:

You seemed to be implying that your "real B.A." was more of an "accomplishment" than a ULC degree, because it was harder to get. I was implying that difficulty is not a true measure of accomplishment. 

 

I never said that it was an accomplishment at all.  Only an ordeal and a torment.  If I had it to do all over again, I would pursue my education at the Public Library.  It would have been so much less expensive -- and a lot more enjoyable.  

 

In point of fact, my school (C.C.N.Y.)  wanted to know what I had done with my B.A. in Jewish Studies  (1977) --  so that they could write up my bio for the 40th anniversary reunion of my class.  I reported my U.L.C. ordination (1978); and my U.L.C. honorary D.D. (1996).

 

Such is the value I place on my B.A.  At the time, it was important to me.  What was I thinking?  How could I have been so stupid?

 

:sigh2:

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Looks nice on a minister's business card.   Don't take it much further than that.  It's only as good as the individual who wields it --just like any degree. 

 

I've know actual Ph.D.'s who had no common sense worth a damn, and honorary D.D.'s who are far more knowledgable.

 

But then again, you've got idiots with honorary degrees similar to Malachi Love-Robinson who try to start up a medical practice with it...

 

Use common sense with your credentials. 

 

--Rev. Samuel

Universal Life Church of Michigan

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I think the degrees are what you put into them. I was an ordained minister in the UMC years ago, yet let my license lapse. I went back into the ministry in the UMC, and my past ordination counted for nothing. They wanted me to "take a refresher course" at one of their Schools of Theology, undergo the mentoring process again, and be voted on by the district conference. I went through years of seminary already, and have kept up my studies not only in Methodist doctrine, but also many other spiritual walks. All that being said, the degrees are worth zilch if they have no meaning in your heart and if you do not know how to apply what you have studied. Like it was said, a degree is worth what the user puts into and gets out of the study.

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3 hours ago, Windwalker said:

I think the degrees are what you put into them. I was an ordained minister in the UMC years ago, yet let my license lapse. I went back into the ministry in the UMC, and my past ordination counted for nothing. They wanted me to "take a refresher course" at one of their Schools of Theology, undergo the mentoring process again, and be voted on by the district conference. I went through years of seminary already, and have kept up my studies not only in Methodist doctrine, but also many other spiritual walks. All that being said, the degrees are worth zilch if they have no meaning in your heart and if you do not know how to apply what you have studied. Like it was said, a degree is worth what the user puts into and gets out of the study.

 

Alright.  What have you put into your degree -- and what is the intended application?  

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I did in fact serve as pastor for a circuit of rural churches in the West Georgia area while attending college, and as Associate Pastor for the church I grew up in, not far from my home. I went through a period of doubt and aimlessness, during which I left the church and let my license lapse. I have been sporadically active in the past few years, giving talks and motivational speeches to small groups. I am now wanting to get back into active ministry, and deciding on whether to start an online ministry, or a physical church. What did I put into my degree? in addition to the required course work, I believe to fully apply your degree and enhance it, you must put yourself into environments that will allow you to use what you have learned, and apply it on a practical basis. One of the most poignant experiences I have had is as a student minister, in the charge of churches I  mentioned above. A man wandered up to the parsonage I lived in, and started asking me about faith and God's will. I talked with him and gave him my views and answers to his questions, and it calmed him and eased his torment. Being a pastor is so much more than standing in a pulpit on Sunday and delivering a sermon. It is responding to the needs of the congregation and the community.

Edited by Windwalker

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On 7/7/2017 at 1:46 PM, Jonathan H. B. Lobl said:

 

I never said that it was an accomplishment at all.  Only an ordeal and a torment.  If I had it to do all over again, I would pursue my education at the Public Library.  It would have been so much less expensive -- and a lot more enjoyable.  

 

In point of fact, my school (C.C.N.Y.)  wanted to know what I had done with my B.A. in Jewish Studies  (1977) --  so that they could write up my bio for the 40th anniversary reunion of my class.  I reported my U.L.C. ordination (1978); and my U.L.C. honorary D.D. (1996).

 

Such is the value I place on my B.A.  At the time, it was important to me.  What was I thinking?  How could I have been so stupid?

I think you are being a bit harsh on yourself. The degree, if taken in perspective represents a certain dedication to effort and perseverance. On the other hand, if it is not applied or thought to be of any value, it is worth no more than a piece of paper.

:sigh2:

 

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20 minutes ago, Windwalker said:

I did in fact serve as pastor for a circuit of rural churches in the West Georgia area while attending college, and as Associate Pastor for the church I grew up in, not far from my home. I went through a period of doubt and aimlessness, during which I left the church and let my license lapse. I have been sporadically active in the past few years, giving talks and motivational speeches to small groups. I am now wanting to get back into active ministry, and deciding on whether to start an online ministry, or a physical church. What did I put into my degree? in addition to the required course work, I believe to fully apply your degree and enhance it, you must put yourself into environments that will allow you to use what you have learned, and apply it on a practical basis. One of the most poignant experiences I have had is as a student minister, in the charge of churches I  mentioned above. A man wandered up to the parsonage I lived in, and started asking me about faith and God's will. I talked with him and gave him my views and answers to his questions, and it calmed him and eased his torment. Being a pastor is so much more than standing in a pulpit on Sunday and delivering a sermon. It is responding to the needs of the congregation and the community.

 

Please clarify.  Which part of this applies to your degree from U.L.C.?  

 

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