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murphzlaw1

Rescue A Dog In San Antonio!

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So some of you may remember a former admin here, Sotik. This, of course, is going back YEARS.

Anyhow, about a year ago, he found a dog that had been dumped in front of his mailbox. Bad case of mange, other issues.

He spent quite a bit of money in vet bills, etc, to make this dog healthy.

Now that the dog is healthy, he says it's time for her to move on. He didn't want to just dump her in a shelter. He's looking for a good family to give her a home.

http://sanantonio.craigslist.org/pet/2641915745.html (basic ad)

http://sanantonio.craigslist.org/pet/2641461870.html (advanced ad, more info!)

https://www.facebook.com/#!/bettyTAP her facebook page! (details everything this poor girl went thru)

Of course, ordinarily I wouldn't post this here, but due to the circumstances, I'd like to see if we can help them out.

Spread the word, ya'll.

Thanks!

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He is in my area, so I shared it on my facebook page. I have 3 dogs already, can't handle any more.

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Thank you everyone for taking the time to try to find a good home for her. I appreciate that.

Hopefully I can find her a good home soon.

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Unfortunately, I'll have to take her to a shelter...I've been unsuccessful in finding a new home for her - I hope they have better luck :(

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The Betty saga has ended.

She is now with a family of animal lovers (to include two young boys and a girl) who just bought a new house with a large fenced yard. The family seemed nice and the wife asked all the right questions before I could. While Betty was understandably scared and will likely be sad for a few days, I'm confident that in a short amount of time she will enjoy her new home and be a loved member of her new family for a long time.

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I would recommend you not visit. I have heard it said that dogs have a long smell memory but the info is not in their conscious memory unless it is cued. They are able to adapt to a new home and new master because without smell or sight they forget about their old owner (consciously) but catching smell of them will bring the memory into their consciousness.

Not sure how true it is but all of my dogs have been rescues and each one adapts to their new home very well within just a few days.

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Mike, I have never seen a problem with it in the past. I have adopted a few dogs (people moving where they can't take the dog mostly) over the years and thier previous owner can and visited with no issue. In fact the dog was "happy" to see them and didnt misbehave at all after.

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Mike, I have never seen a problem with it in the past. I have adopted a few dogs (people moving where they can't take the dog mostly) over the years and thier previous owner can and visited with no issue. In fact the dog was "happy" to see them and didnt misbehave at all after.

Ahhh. I would defer to you then. I have never had a previous owner visit my dogs but I have had 1 that freaked out when we returned to the shelter. About 20 feet from the door she went from happy and walking with me to fighting me for every step. So, all I know is they remember stuff many months later. =)

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Therein lies the key.

My former neighbor and I used to raise black lab puppies to be trained as seeing eye dogs for the blind and hearing dogs for the deaf. Once in a while, circumstances would arrise where we would come to see the dogs again. It is stranger to see the dog's reaction in that case, because they are trained that when in harness or in the service vest, they are strictly business - no playing, their only attention is to their person's commands or signaling as trained. But take that harness off, or let them out of the vest for time off, and it's wags and doggie kisses all around. The dogs we trained would act like "Duuuuude! Where ya been?! Gimme a biscuit and let's play!" But the good thing is with their training, when play time is over, you can simply give them the appropriate command, and they snap back to business.

It was a bit of a heartbreak each time we had to give up a dog for final training and adoption, but it becomes a lot easier when you think that it is the efforts of raisers who host and shape these puppies for a year or so that form the foundations that allow blind people or deaf people to have more independence and enjoy day to day life.

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So glad to hear ya got him a nice home Sotik, always good news to hear.

Dogs especially, but even cats, have long and short term "Memory moments" and yes, a lot of it depends on positive or negative memories of a person or place. Many of the dogs I've sheltered for short periods, when seeing them again are like Br. Devon said; all wags and "what's up? Where ya been!" Happy to see me/us. Only one had a stand offish feeling and after watching the new "owner" could see why, it was us, it was him. Very controlling.

Even our little "Herbie" and "Turbo" with us eight months now and no new home...toooo many cats/kittens on boards and posters...four days at one person home and they brought them back...the poor thing has not used a cat-box since being there...all too obvious the little girl traumatized the kitten at 8 weeks in the sand box. Herbie will only use planter box on patio. Put a scoop of "cat sand" in it she'll go use planter out front.

All the little girl ever admitted to when we inquired "She wouldn't do what I told her to!" and stomped off. I hope families like that NEVER get animals again...and they too "said/asked all the right things" when they came to get the kittens. We have posted the family name to all shelters and outlets in the area as "No adoption". That little girl reminded me of "Chucky" from the movie.

BTW, we still have two cute, adorable kittens "Herbie" and "Turbo"!! if anyone can think of anyone interested.

Blessings of Peace,

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I miss having "cuddle fuzzies" in the house, but since I live in a motel room, it would not be fair to have any companion animal that wasn't stuffed with a tag on it's tushie. All the pets that I have shared a household with were family members with more hair and different needs, and were treated as such. All were rescues. The two toughest rescues were the cat who never got a name - the poor thing passed before we got a chance to name her, but at least she passed in the hands of friends. A child decided her tail was a carrying handle and dragged her up a fight of stairs, letting her head smack against each tread on the way up. What kind of parents allow their child near a living creature without proper supervision?! I wanted to drag the child face first up a flight of stairs, so she could understand what kitty felt. My other big rescue was a dog that was in training to be a guide dog, and then was discovered to have mental issues. The dog would literally run in circles and scream in an octave that resembled a young girl having her hair pulled (so I was told). My next door neighbor gave her a nice quiet home, where she was welcome to play when she wished, and was separated from other animals, strangers and other things that would stress her to confusion. Intorducing her to new people was a process: they first would have to surrender a clothing item that bore their scent so Smudge could get comfortable with the scent, then over a slow process, the new person would be introduced, supervised and bearing treats, and instructed to sit on the floor in a totally passive pose and allow Smudge to come to them, sniff, and take the snack, which would be placed just over an arm's length away, while speaking softly and offering encouragement. Few people came into Smudge's life, because she was easily confused and scared of changes, but we were fortunate enough to be able to give her an environment that made her happy and she learned there were people she could trust and have fun with. I am proud that because of my neighbor and the few volunteers that were able to help raise Smudge, she lived to be just shy of 11 (the vet never thought she would live that long, due to her issues, and had recomended "the big blue shot.") I am not a major believer in karma, as such, but I hope that if I ever have a health issue that affects my quality of life that I will be surrounded by those who love me and will care for me and not think I am a nuisance that needs to be euthanized.

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Alas, I won't be visiting her. From the moment I picked her up from the street, she's been crazy in doggy-love with me. I think she will have adapted by now, but I don't expect in this instance it'll have been easy.* I don't want to further confuse the situation by showing up periodically.

* Her attachment has been such that she never strayed more than 30 feet from me (and even that took months to get that far) and on the few occasions I was unable to come home at nights (army stuff or out of town for work) she spent every night pacing the house back and forth looking for me almost all night long, getting almost no sleep. So I expect in this circumstance, she'll have a little separation anxiety, and it will be better to go cold turkey with a new loving family.

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It is a heartbreak that I can relate to. Each time I raised a puppy to become a guide dog for a blind person or a signal dog for a deaf person, it meant giving away part of my soul once that dog became old enough to go into formal training and finally be placed with her person who needed her (all the service dogs I raised and trained were female). Friends would ask me how I could part with these special dogs, but I always remembered one thing that made the goodbyes worth it: if it were not for volunteers who are willing to have their hearts broken just a bit, there would be no service dogs, and so many people would have less independence. So yes, I will allow myself to hurt and to heal because it is for the greater good.

Know that she is with people who love her - if you are lucky, perhaps they can send you pictures or a video of her playing - something that won't throw her off.

It is the heart that can break that feels love most.

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