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Himitsuko

The Craft Of The Wise

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And you can be a witch and not be wiccan..

True now, but not a couple of decades ago. :) Some of us are guilty of still using them interchangeably.

It is such now that a Witch is someone with natural abilities, and a Wiccan is one who follows the religious traditions and tenets.

And then there is the issue of what defines Wicca and a Wiccan.

There is the United States Federal government criteria that explains what elements Wicca has that makes it definable by the government for being a religion.

There is the British Traditional Wica that defines what Wica is by their Traditions.

There is the definition of what Witches of the British Isles use to explain what Wicca is according to those cultures.

There is the definition of Hereditary Witches and their families that explain what a Witch or Wiccan is to them.

And then you have the multitudes of people all over the world who read the Llewellyn Publishing books on Wicca and before they finished the book, they are already saying they are Wiccans for picking the book up! heheh

So how do you find out what Wicca is? Well, honestly, for those of us in the Old Religions (and this is universal) we have "tests" of looking for "key words" and responses we look for in others when determining for ourselves if an individual is "one of us" or not. These aren't secret handshakes or passwords...they are something innate that the soul knows, and they are automatic responses to a "challenge" by another. They can be taught, like in Initiation, but largely, they are innately known. For myself, I am not even aware I "knew" what I was saying and doing until it was already being done. And if I used the same criteria to "test" my own students, I don't think even one would pass. (But I do require this innate knowledge of my lovers, people I marry, and my High Priest...which all tend to end up being the same man. heheh) But it cannot and will not ever be found in books or the internet. So no matter what, the Mysteries and the Secrets are kept hidden. It's comforting to me, but I know in this "fast food generation" it is frustrating for most students.

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Arcana, That was a great post and thanks for sharing. As always happens during my dark time I have been away deep in my thoughts and experiences and haven't been checking in for a while, but this is a good topic for all types of practioners to really get into good honest discussion about our personal mysteries-and our inner perceptions of the Divine world and how those perceptions influence us in dailly life.

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You know, I never actually meant to be speaking only to Wiccans. In fact, despite using a Wiccan term for a thought as old as time (Craft of the Wise) there is nothing in my posts that is specifically Wiccan, and I am not myself Wiccan and have never claimed to be. By invoking "The Craft of the Wise" I am literally speaking of the practices of Wise people with their eyes on the world through any or all of it's amazing prisms. Not all who are of the Craft are necessarily Wiccan either, creating another beautiful nuance of spirituality which is too often not taught early enough.

It is our experiences that make us what we are and we are not all dancing to the same tunes and those tunes aren't all being played at the same pace. Perhaps one of the most important lessons that we as adults fully in our crafts have learned is that every individual life, each person, whole or broken, young or old, must be taken as they are. It is our very ability to see beyond preconcieved notions that gives us vision.

A spiritual path is as individual as a painter's strokes. Similarities in style and subject abound, but hidden beneath the picture is a story of creation and destruction that can never be written the same way by someone else.

An overzealous determination to reach the masses with a cohesive doctrine of this is this and that is that is what has robbed so many of the great faiths of their ability to grow and adapt in a world that is begging us to collectively see beyond our selfish and fear-fed definitions and labels.

I wanted to briefly comment on the following statement as I fear it may mislead our younger readers into believing a false dichotomy actually exists.

...traditionally Wicca is NOT in harmony with the Zen philosophy. Zen is Eastern and passive. Wicca is Western and active. To use an Eastern term, Wicca is more Yang than Yin.

Zen is an Eastern philosophy and it is true that traditional Eastern thinking is, even after a couple glances, vastly differs from traditional Western thinking. But it is not fair to say that Zen is passive, or even that Wicca is more Yang than Yin. Zen didn't help make the samurai one of the most effective and remarkable fighting forces in history by being passive. Zen is largely concerned with knowing when and how to act. Once a situation has been considered and a decision made, the consequence of that action should be swift and total. There is little room in Zen for victimization. It is a razor sharp philosophy that can be applied on the battlefield, in the boardroom, (another battlefield with a little less bloodshed) in the kitchen, while hunting, while harvesting, and certainly while dealing with conflict head-on. The courage to act holds all the same importance in eastern philosophies as it does in western ones.

Also, like many of the pagan spiritual paths, the philosophy of Zen is easily adaptable to individual needs and practices.

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This is a most refreshing thread.

It seems to be discussing Spiritual Wisdom unfettered by any belief system.

Thank you to all who are contributing.

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~ Himitsuko, I just want to say I'm in awe of your post. Thank you so very much!!!

You know, I never actually meant to be speaking only to Wiccans. In fact, despite using a Wiccan term for a thought as old as time (Craft of the Wise) there is nothing in my posts that is specifically Wiccan, and I am not myself Wiccan and have never claimed to be. By invoking "The Craft of the Wise" I am literally speaking of the practices of Wise people with their eyes on the world through any or all of it's amazing prisms. Not all who are of the Craft are necessarily Wiccan either, creating another beautiful nuance of spirituality which is too often not taught early enough.

It is our experiences that make us what we are and we are not all dancing to the same tunes and those tunes aren't all being played at the same pace. Perhaps one of the most important lessons that we as adults fully in our crafts have learned is that every individual life, each person, whole or broken, young or old, must be taken as they are. It is our very ability to see beyond preconcieved notions that gives us vision.

A spiritual path is as individual as a painter's strokes. Similarities in style and subject abound, but hidden beneath the picture is a story of creation and destruction that can never be written the same way by someone else.

An overzealous determination to reach the masses with a cohesive doctrine of this is this and that is that is what has robbed so many of the great faiths of their ability to grow and adapt in a world that is begging us to collectively see beyond our selfish and fear-fed definitions and labels.

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You know, I never actually meant to be speaking only to Wiccans. In fact, despite using a Wiccan term for a thought as old as time (Craft of the Wise) there is nothing in my posts that is specifically Wiccan, and I am not myself Wiccan and have never claimed to be. By invoking "The Craft of the Wise" I am literally speaking of the practices of Wise people with their eyes on the world through any or all of it's amazing prisms. Not all who are of the Craft are necessarily Wiccan either, creating another beautiful nuance of spirituality which is too often not taught early enough.

Alright, but are you aware of that another term for Wicca, specifically, is Craft of the Wise? It is what, generally, Wicca means. To use this term and say it is not specifically Wiccan is, and I asked other Wiccans, disrespectful. It would be like saying something was [insert religion name here] but you did not specifically mean that religion.

Since Craft of the Wise is another, very specific term of Wicca, we can't even come up with a comparison to make the point you are using a specific term non-specifically. What made you use the term? And are you aware it does mean specifically Wicca?

Zen is an Eastern philosophy and it is true that traditional Eastern thinking is, even after a couple glances, vastly differs from traditional Western thinking. But it is not fair to say that Zen is passive, or even that Wicca is more Yang than Yin. Zen didn't help make the samurai one of the most effective and remarkable fighting forces in history by being passive. Zen is largely concerned with knowing when and how to act. Once a situation has been considered and a decision made, the consequence of that action should be swift and total. There is little room in Zen for victimization. It is a razor sharp philosophy that can be applied on the battlefield, in the boardroom, (another battlefield with a little less bloodshed) in the kitchen, while hunting, while harvesting, and certainly while dealing with conflict head-on. The courage to act holds all the same importance in eastern philosophies as it does in western ones.

Also, like many of the pagan spiritual paths, the philosophy of Zen is easily adaptable to individual needs and practices.

This another misleading "fact." We are going to look up some specific references, but Zen is a Chinese philosophy. Samurai is Japanese. Samurai may use Zen when it came to Japan, but not in combat because it is a passive philosophy. I am seeking specific references to support my claim on this. I did a research paper on the Samurai for my Asian art class, so I will track that down. My Buddhist and martial arts friends are also not agreeing with you (I am sharing this discussion with others of my church. :)) So when I get the facts together I will let you know.

I have no issues with universal concepts of religions (obviously!) but I also strongly believe in giving respect to the traditional religions of the world, and honoring their beliefs and concepts without mixing them together and/or without giving them honor to their specific religion.

I think you are mixing terms and philosophies here and justifying using them in your own personal definition, without honoring or respecting the traditions and religions themselves. And giving misleading information.

I certainly do not think you mean to offend anyone (at least I hope not!) but in using terms nonspecifically when they are accepted as being specific, it may be something you may want to at least reconsider how you use such terms, so you are not offending anyone.

Give me some time to get those facts together. ;)

Okay, so you've read so many Wiccan texts you have the first chapter memorized. You know all about the rules of manipulation and control. You and Karma and close buddies (most of the time.) Your spells work pretty consistantly, and you may even have a stable group that you work well with-though lets face it, more of us are solitary than would like to be. But your at that threshhold, that plateau, where you have control of yourself and have learned that by controling yourself, you really can control your environment and thus your personal reality. And now...for something completely different.

I think here in your first post you WERE specifically using Wicca as Craft of the Wise. Which is what I was responding to.

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Arcana

Alright, but are you aware of that another term for Wicca, specifically, is Craft of the Wise? It is what, generally, Wicca means. To use this term and say it is not specifically Wiccan is, and I asked other Wiccans, disrespectful. It would be like saying something was [insert religion name here] but you did not specifically mean that religion.

Since Craft of the Wise is another, very specific term of Wicca, we can't even come up with a comparison to make the point you are using a specific term non-specifically. What made you use the term? And are you aware it does mean specifically Wicca?

A person can follow Christ and not call themselves a Christian. A person can learn to defend themselves from physical harm - diverting the energy in a spirit of love - and yet not be a trained practitioner of AiKiDo. This is because the principles of either cannot be claimed or owned by any one faction. Anything real is there to be claimed, known, and practiced by all - otherwise it's a weak fantasy.

That is why mystics exist in all paths, rather than just one true path.

I think it would be sad if Wicca fell into the trap of calling itself The Craft of the Wise rather than A Craft of the Wise.

There's not a lot of difference between the one true path and the one true craft. IMHO

Edited by Tsukino_Rei

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~ Arcana, I understand your pride in the path you follow, & the desire for the respect that you deserve :) I'm sure you've worked hard to be where you are.

I thought Wicca meant 'wise' or 'wise one'. Am I wrong? If so, I would very much like to be corrected!

Personally, I thought Tsukino spot-on in her post.

I'm sure she meant no disrespect to you or your fellow practitioners... Perhaps more education would be beneficial?

Would you please elucidate upon more of the particulars of your practice? I'm sure we would appreciate it :D

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I think it would be sad if Wicca fell into the trap of calling itself The Craft of the Wise rather than A Craft of the Wise.

There's not a lot of difference between the one true path and the one true craft. IMHO

Entitling the discussion as "THE Craft of the Wise" that would specifically refer to Wicca. And I quoted how in her first post she WAS specifically referring to Wicca.

Perhaps the topic changed as it went along, but I was responding to the first post, which was referring specifically to Wicca.

I am not saying that Wicca "claims" such a title. But it is understood in interfaith Circles that "The Craft of the Wise" refers to Wicca. I asked around among other groups and other ministers, and this is pretty universal in understanding.

I am not sure why pointing out that this is something, as far as I can see, is understood universally is being criticized. And I think she originally started off as a discussion as Wicca, and being pointed out where she is not referring to the philosophies as such caught her in a pickle, so she tried to digress and said it meant any religion. That is my opinion, anyway. :)

Other organizations will also refer to what they believe and practice as The Craft, such as Freemasonry. So I was not implying that Wicca owns the name The Craft...I am pointing out how the thread started and referring specifically to that. And I think the original author twisted things around and then called it Wicca. Then being called on it, backpedaled, and the rest of you missed the point and are using the concept of Universality, saying it isn't specifically one thing or another.

And this leads to another point: this is the TRAP (to use your term) of eclectism, universality, and the New Age concepts, to mish mash beliefs together without giving credit and respect to the sources of where the concepts and ideas come from, or taking the mixture and claiming it to be a form of a religion, when essentially it is a concept that is unique to the individual mixing the beliefs together. So instead of trying to define it as one religion, or using the name of a religion that has a history, tradition, and recognizable beliefs and practices, just claim it as individual, and credit the sources where the individual derived inspiration from. Otherwise, I would put it in the category of something akin to plagiarism, which is disrespectful.

It Wicca is understood to be "The Craft of the Wise" then give respect to that term instead of twisting it all around and making it apply to ALL religions. Why not just use another term, since this one is already being used?

I would invite you to re-read the very first post, and see what I am talking about. :)

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~ Arcana, I understand your pride in the path you follow, & the desire for the respect that you deserve :) I'm sure you've worked hard to be where you are.

I thought Wicca meant 'wise' or 'wise one'. Am I wrong? If so, I would very much like to be corrected!

Personally, I thought Tsukino spot-on in her post.

I'm sure she meant no disrespect to you or your fellow practitioners... Perhaps more education would be beneficial?

Would you please elucidate upon more of the particulars of your practice? I'm sure we would appreciate it :D

I was merely trying to point out where the use of the term for something other than Wicca could be disrespectful, and stated in my post that I do not think she meant to be. Based upon her age and her explanations in her writings, I have come to the conclusion she is young, probably received most of her education about Wicca from books and the internet rather than training from a coven or other Witch, and probably has a lack of understanding of the traditions of the Old Ways/Craft of the Wise/Wicca/Witchcraft.

The use of the term Craft of the Wise is an even older reference to the practices of the religion (along with the term "Old Ways") used before the use of Wicca to define the religion, beliefs, and practices.

The etymology of the word Wicca and what it means is still a topic of debate, even among Wiccans and Pagans.

I would suggest reading this article:

http://www.twpt.com/witchbyanyothername.htm

Which I think goes into the complexity of the origins of the name well enough, and would be essentially what I would have to explain. :)

Here are some other links concerning the etymology of the word "Wicca." After going through these sources, you can see that the answer to your question that Wicca means "wise" or "wise one" is not so easily answered with a simple "yes" or "no."

http://wiccanhistorian.home.att.net/bos/et...ogyofwicca.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch_(etymology)

Edited by Arcana

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Entitling the discussion as "THE Craft of the Wise" that would specifically refer to Wicca. And I quoted how in her first post she WAS specifically referring to Wicca.

Perhaps the topic changed as it went along, but I was responding to the first post, which was referring specifically to Wicca.

I am not saying that Wicca "claims" such a title. But it is understood in interfaith Circles that "The Craft of the Wise" refers to Wicca. I asked around among other groups and other ministers, and this is pretty universal in understanding.

I am not sure why pointing out that this is something, as far as I can see, is understood universally is being criticized. And I think she originally started off as a discussion as Wicca, and being pointed out where she is not referring to the philosophies as such caught her in a pickle, so she tried to digress and said it meant any religion. That is my opinion, anyway. :)

Other organizations will also refer to what they believe and practice as The Craft, such as Freemasonry. So I was not implying that Wicca owns the name The Craft...I am pointing out how the thread started and referring specifically to that. And I think the original author twisted things around and then called it Wicca. Then being called on it, backpedaled, and the rest of you missed the point and are using the concept of Universality, saying it isn't specifically one thing or another.

And this leads to another point: this is the TRAP (to use your term) of eclectism, universality, and the New Age concepts, to mish mash beliefs together without giving credit and respect to the sources of where the concepts and ideas come from, or taking the mixture and claiming it to be a form of a religion, when essentially it is a concept that is unique to the individual mixing the beliefs together. So instead of trying to define it as one religion, or using the name of a religion that has a history, tradition, and recognizable beliefs and practices, just claim it as individual, and credit the sources where the individual derived inspiration from. Otherwise, I would put it in the category of something akin to plagiarism, which is disrespectful.

It Wicca is understood to be "The Craft of the Wise" then give respect to that term instead of twisting it all around and making it apply to ALL religions. Why not just use another term, since this one is already being used?

I would invite you to re-read the very first post, and see what I am talking about. :)

Speaking from my experience of another religion that takes pride in its history, everyone and their dogs cousin can agree that a concept is unique to and inseparable from their special religion but that doesn't make it true. Truth by popular vote seems to be a trap common to organized religions. And sects and denominations form based through breaks in popular vote. It also seems to be common for religions develop sects of followers who are more inclusive and sects of followers who are less inclusive. If a religions beleifs are a fanstasy made up by a fiction author whom has stated so and has thus copyrighted much of the works, as in the case of scientology. Then by all means it's followers are in their rights to call plaigairism and protect it's concepts for sale to whom they choose. But if a religion claims to connect to real truth present in the universe, and to connect it's followers to those truths, and to develop and draw from real power and understanding, then applying universality to it is not a trap, it's honesty.

Edited by Tsukino_Rei

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I am not that young (29) and have studied religion my whole life as my father was among other things a Christian minister and took me all over the world (literally and physically) in order to better understand the nature of God and the belief systems of many cultures.

Let me take one point at a time. First as discussion of Zen Buddhism (which did orignate in China but came to a most unique and beautiful blossom in Japan)and it's role in the history of the samurai.

Samurai may use Zen when it came to Japan, but not in combat because it is a passive philosophy. I am seeking specific references to support my claim on this. I did a research paper on the Samurai for my Asian art class, so I will track that down. My Buddhist and martial arts friends are also not agreeing with you

First, let me suggest a little light reading. I highly recommend Winston King's Zen and the Way of the Sword: Arming the Samurai Psyche As a professor at Vanderbilt college I would hope he can be considered at least one valid source on the unique symetry that developed when Zen Buddhism was introduced to the imperiallistic Japanese. The following is a quoted review by Charles B. Jones of the Department of Religion at Carleton College.

How is it that the samurai of medieval Japan found in Zen Buddhism an ideology and a method of training that fitted them for such an un-Buddhist occupation?

In different sections, King tackles this question from a number of angles. He begins with historical considerations, outlining the early history of Zen in Japan as well as the conditions that led to the rise of the samurai as a self-conscious class. He then explores the culture of the samurai, centering his discussion around the image of the sword... King also looks at the general ethos of the samurai, an ethos encapsulated in the word bushidoo, "the way of the warrior." This was an ethos that hinged on such values as selfless loyalty, courage, action without forethought or hesitation, and the acceptance of the ever-present reality of death. The training in swordsmanship (or any other martial art) and the values of bushidoo, King says, provided the point of entree, the nexus where Zen training and values could be put to use, and therein lies the explanation for the popularity of Zen among the samurai to the virtual exclusion of all other forms of Buddhism. Zen monastic training provided the warrior with the freedom of mind that allowed him to strike the lethal blow, to move beyond the confines of his meticulously-cultivated techniques and strategies when the occasion demanded them, and to do so from what King calls "a stable inner platform of mental control." Zen training conditioned the mind to move in perfect freedom, to achieve a state of unity with the sword, the opponent, and the movements of the combat situation. By cultivating the "mind of no-mind," the warrior made himself invincible by the paradoxical act of putting all thoughts of life and death, victory and defeat completely out of his mind, and by focusing completely on the present moment and the ever-changing tide of combat. In terms of the ethics of bushidoo, the training of Zen meditation helped in two ways: in the cultivation of selflessness, and in the dissolution of distinctions of life and death. The first aided the samurai in cultivating an attitude of complete submission and loyalty to his master. By realizing the truth of selflessness, the samurai could deny himself completely and live his life solely for his lord. The second enabled him to kill and be killed without complaint and without fear. One could strike without regret, and die without fear. How did the samurai square their occupations with the general Buddhist principle of nonviolence? King tells us that this was based on the view of rebirth and karma. If one found himself born into a samurai family, then that was simply a manifestation of his karma to be accepted without rancor. They sought only to fulfil their duties within the bounds of present circumstances. Some hoped that by doing their best as a samurai and fulfilling class ideals, they might gain a better rebirth without the necessity of fighting and killing. Some, however, took their oaths of loyalty to the extreme of hoping for rebirth into the same samurai family so that they could continue serving their lord and his descendents.

There is no disagreement among any scholar I know of the powerful effect the introduction of Zen Buddhism had on the Japanese. And I definitely would not classify that effect as wholly passive, nor do I understand Zen to be an entirely passive philosophy.

Also, we were speaking of the compatablility of Zen philosophy with Wicca specifically and of other Western pagan practices more generally. I asserted that Zen was a compatible philosophy with Western pagan practices, perhaps especially Druidism, and it was argued that this is not so. That issue itself was not discussed or resolved, but this would be one place to explore that connection.

Now, for my apparently inappropriate topic title. I did use the title "The Craft of the Wise" because I had intended to be speaking to advanced mystics and witches about their practices and philosophies. I expected there would be twice as many Wiccans in the discussion as other pagan philosophies, because this is often case when addressing a large and unknown group of pagans and coming from an almost purely mystic path that cares little about the boundary lines and particular phrases of specific paths, I wanted to be certain that our younger Wiccans readers and contributors knew I wanted to include them as well, while elevating the practice of "The Craft" to those beyond the confines of the Wiccan path specifically.

I was merely trying to point out where the use of the term for something other than Wicca could be disrespectful, and stated in my post that I do not think she meant to be. Based upon her age and her explanations in her writings, I have come to the conclusion she is young, probably received most of her education about Wicca from books and the internet rather than training from a coven or other Witch, and probably has a lack of understanding of the traditions of the Old Ways/Craft of the Wise/Wicca/Witchcraft.

It is quite difficult to not feel utterly insulted and defensive when I read this. I have had formal training in Wicca. Lots of it. Take a look at the last five years of my posts on this very site and you will find that my understanding of Wicca has been lauded often by practitioners much older and more advanced than myself. I do not think that borrowing this wonderful phrase from them is disrespectful at all. Quite the opposite in fact, as I was honoring my Wiccan brothers and sisters. And considering how much Wicca borrowed from the Druids, and I am a Druid of some degree in my order, I see no reason for a Wiccan to complain about a liberal usage of phrasing. How can we praise the individuality of the pagan spiritualities and then argue over whether or not a kindred has the right to use a technique, philosophy, method, or phrase, while trying to discuss large abstract concepts to people they've never seen, over the internet no less.

I am far past nitpicking definitions. If you are wise enough and educated enough to gleen my meaning and spend your time looking at the spirit of the content of my posts rather than hacking my phraseology-which can change in common usage definition from state to state- then please continue with what is otherwise a unique and interesting discussion of magickal practice and theory. If this is not the topic for you, please move on, and be blessed.

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Does the full moon on the 12th have any extra significance since it is the month of the Yule. If falling on the solstice make the full moon any more significant in Dec.

Just curious?

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And a good question too Fawzo.

To answer your first question. The full moon in December holds no more or less power because of it's relative closeness to Yule. However, when a Sabbat falls on the Full Moon, which is infrequent, but certainly occurs, it is likely that all the characteristics of that Day would be amplified, even if only in the minds of practioners.

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And a good question too Fawzo.

To answer your first question. The full moon in December holds no more or less power because of it's relative closeness to Yule. However, when a Sabbat falls on the Full Moon, which is infrequent, but certainly occurs, it is likely that all the characteristics of that Day would be amplified, even if only in the minds of practioners.

Thanks!

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True Zen comes from the no-minds of Gautam & Lao Tsu, Bodhidharma making the connect when he went from India to China.

There really is no Zen Buddhism, cause religion is of the mind, and Zen means beyond mind. There is no philosophy cause philosophy is of the mind.

Was Jesus a Christian? Was Gautam a Buddhist? Seems the students make the religions after the Master is gone.

"Mind is only thought...Take away thought, where is mind?"

The reason Zen is suited to combat is that combat is a NOW thing...Every thought is of past or future. There is no time for thought in combat. The mind is of no use NOW.

Ever been in a car wreck? Happens fast, we usually don't remember the details.

In sword play, as all martial arts, the training 'speaks' for itself. There is no thought.

If you touch something very hot, do you have to think about moving away from the heat?

If a weapon is fast approaching your sphere of energy...No time for thought!

This is what Gautam and Lao Tsu discovered. If you shut off the chattering mind, truth remains. And your training remains, in Martial and other Arts.

Thought is the 'dust on the mirror' that clouds our vision. No matter how Grand the thoughts...still dust clouding our vision.

Tibetan Buddhism says;

1. Truth IS.

2. Mind is the barrier(dust).

3. No-mind is the door.

Why do we need to invent stuff. We must be careful...Like Edgar Cayce said, "Mind is the maker." Isn't our Truth, our connection to each other, our Love, enough?

If you shut off the mind, Truth is not gone. It is what's still 't/here'.

"Nothing real can be threatened,

Nothing unreal exists.

Herein lies the Peace of God."

Gautam said;

'The fletcher whittles his arrows,

The farmer tills his fields,

The wise direct their mind."

Maybe we can direct our mind AS we till the field, and whittle the arrows!

"A thought is the smallest particle in the universe...Also the largest, cause the universe is made of it."

Namaste

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True Zen comes from the no-minds of Gautam & Lao Tsu, Bodhidharma making the connect when he went from India to China.

There really is no Zen Buddhism, cause religion is of the mind, and Zen means beyond mind. There is no philosophy cause philosophy is of the mind.

Was Jesus a Christian? Was Gautam a Buddhist? Seems the students make the religions after the Master is gone.

"Mind is only thought...Take away thought, where is mind?"

The reason Zen is suited to combat is that combat is a NOW thing...Every thought is of past or future. There is no time for thought in combat. The mind is of no use NOW.

Ever been in a car wreck? Happens fast, we usually don't remember the details.

In sword play, as all martial arts, the training 'speaks' for itself. There is no thought.

If you touch something very hot, do you have to think about moving away from the heat?

If a weapon is fast approaching your sphere of energy...No time for thought!

This is what Gautam and Lao Tsu discovered. If you shut off the chattering mind, truth remains. And your training remains, in Martial and other Arts.

Thought is the 'dust on the mirror' that clouds our vision. No matter how Grand the thoughts...still dust clouding our vision.

Tibetan Buddhism says;

1. Truth IS.

2. Mind is the barrier(dust).

3. No-mind is the door.

Why do we need to invent stuff. We must be careful...Like Edgar Cayce said, "Mind is the maker." Isn't our Truth, our connection to each other, our Love, enough?

If you shut off the mind, Truth is not gone. It is what's still 't/here'.

"Nothing real can be threatened,

Nothing unreal exists.

Herein lies the Peace of God."

Gautam said;

'The fletcher whittles his arrows,

The farmer tills his fields,

The wise direct their mind."

Maybe we can direct our mind AS we till the field, and whittle the arrows!

"A thought is the smallest particle in the universe...Also the largest, cause the universe is made of it."

Namaste

That's a powerful message, thank you.

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Thank you Lawyer for your contribution. Are these principles something that you use in your daily life, and if so, in what ways do you most commonly apply them?

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Himitsuko,

Thank You for the question. I carried it with me all day, trying to think of the answer.

To summerize the answer;

I would say that all things happen NOW.

By living in the NOW, it seems I am 'there' waiting for them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPg9DnMP2D4

Eckhart Tolle is one of the best 'Zen teachers' I've heard, and never mentions it...How Zen!

Namaste

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