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Does Christianity Teach To Stay Away From Non Christians?


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#1 musicman153

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:04 AM

I know this place is very eclectic as I've been here since its beginning but......

I listen to TV preachers quite often for various reasons one of which is that I usually catch them teaching (preaching) things other then what the bible says.

In any case i hear the vast majority of them saying that you should not consort with non Christians.

Prejudice is born of ignorance. My Parents who have become more church going in their old age are very prejudice in my opinion. They talk about the "Dot Heads" and a number of other cultures, religious groups and races with dislike. I wouldn't call it hatred but very ignorant as they don't know any of these people, have no idea about their culture or religion and generally don't have a clue.

And yet they go to church every Sunday, hold bible studies in their home and are what they would consider "Good Christians"..

And then they wonder why I wouldn't want to be a Christian. :wizard:

#2 Tsukino_Rei

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:33 AM

Short answer yes, long answer no. Longer answer, some yes, some no. Remember there are LOADS of sects within Christianity with LOADS of different philosophies, (many of which don't consider each other to be Christian but that's another can of worms). Much of Fundamentalist, and ironically Evangelical Christianity does teach their followers to stay away from non Christian people and non Christian books, music, television, movies, and politics. But even within that there are those who vocally disagree and go spend time with regular people in the local bar or *gasp* watch Harry Potter!

What are dot heads?

#3 Zequatanil

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:56 AM

Sadly yes--especially amongst most Christians it is very prominent. The more they profess to be religious, the more fundamental their thinking, the less tolerant they are of other religions. I would say within the Christian sects it is very prominent--all you have to do is open the Tv and watch some of the religious programming. It is the same with Catholics as well. The more fundamental, the more the hate and intolerance--I have ties with Hindus and Buddhists--they don`t have a problem with anyone.

blessings and peace,

S

Edited by sarkany, 20 July 2012 - 12:01 PM.


#4 Jonathan H. B. Lobl

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:57 AM

I know this place is very eclectic as I've been here since its beginning but......

I listen to TV preachers quite often for various reasons one of which is that I usually catch them teaching (preaching) things other then what the bible says.

In any case i hear the vast majority of them saying that you should not consort with non Christians.

Prejudice is born of ignorance. My Parents who have become more church going in their old age are very prejudice in my opinion. They talk about the "Dot Heads" and a number of other cultures, religious groups and races with dislike. I wouldn't call it hatred but very ignorant as they don't know any of these people, have no idea about their culture or religion and generally don't have a clue.

And yet they go to church every Sunday, hold bible studies in their home and are what they would consider "Good Christians"..

And then they wonder why I wouldn't want to be a Christian. :wizard:


What a tribute to the love of the Prince of Peace.

I have another question for you. Why would Non-Christians want to "consort" with them?

#5 RabbiO

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:16 PM

What are dot heads?


I looked it up - I didn't know either.

Dot heads is a derogatory term for Hindus.

#6 Tsukino_Rei

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:12 PM

ooooooooh. With dots on their heads. Now I feel a bit daft for not making the connection on my own. Not a very good insult though. The dots are pretty! :cupidarrow:

Edited by Tsukino_Rei, 20 July 2012 - 01:13 PM.


#7 Atwater Vitki

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:19 PM

Musicman- You describe the home I was raised in. My Dad, may he rest in peace, had a comical (so he thought) accent or get up for several different cultures and would tell the most dry, and bad taste jokes, to his fellow congregants at every chance. Almost everyone thought he was the hit of the party but my sibs and I thought it was just short of disgusting.

As I've found out here, nearly everything I was "taught" as a kid and young adult by the Evangelical church about other religions, was hyperbole and nonfactual. The first questions my folks would ask me about any "new kid" I'd mention going over to was "what church do they go to?"...if they didn't attend one of the Lutheran or Evangelical..."why would you want to go over there?" and it would be argued until sunrise.

Yes, unfortunately the church I was raised in did, and still does, teach separation and prejudice....not at all what Jesus would do!

Blessings of Peace,

#8 musicman153

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:57 PM

What are dot heads?


lol Yes I think the Bindhi is lovely also,

The Buddha had said "The one thing all people have in common is they want to be happy"

I was taking to my nephew just now about religion politics and such. He just returned from Afghanistan and said that had heard comments about the people there such as " we should just nuke them all" to which he responded " most of the people there are just like you and I. They only want to make a living, raise their families and love one another".

I guess my point of the post is, If you don't get to know others who are not like you.... you do not have an educated opinion of them. I think the "Fundys" fear that if you compare thought, beliefs, books etc you might fall from the flock and stop your financial contributions.

#9 Tsukino_Rei

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:04 PM

I think the fear runs much deeper than a loss of financial contribution. Rather it's a fight or flight response stimulated by a perceived challenge to the ideological foundations upon which they've built their sense of self and how they relate to others and their universe. A potential collapse of world view can be a scary thing. It's a type of 'culture shock' which people aren't usually consciously aware is happening to them, so it can easily be attributed to the satanic, to demons, or some form of spiritual attack.

#10 mark 45

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:12 PM

while i am NOT a christian,i find the topics concerning them lately to be quite insulting to them.tsu is right,there are many different types out there and they all don't believe the same.but lets keep something in mind,you can find haters in any belief system,or lack thereof.

Edited by mark 45, 20 July 2012 - 05:15 PM.


#11 Jonathan H. B. Lobl

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 07:53 PM

while i am NOT a christian,i find the topics concerning them lately to be quite insulting to them.tsu is right,there are many different types out there and they all don't believe the same.but lets keep something in mind,you can find haters in any belief system,or lack thereof.



Speaking only from my own loose observations; Christianity in America does have one problem. It is the dominant religion. When I was growing up, it was the dominant cultural forces that I found to be so smug and aggressive. Unfair? Possibly. It is what I experienced before I was interested in fairness. Had a different religion been in cultural dominance -- I might well have resented them when I was a child -- instead. It is hard to know. Islam wasn't around then. At least, not around me.

If the dominant group wants the power and privledge -- they have to expect resentment from those they preach at. Perhaps my childhood memories are not fair. The memories linger. I was preached at a lot. I still am.

Strange, it is never the Hindus or the Buddhists or the Atheists who want to save my soul. Not the Daoists, Wiccans...........

Edited by Jonathan H. B. Lobl, 20 July 2012 - 08:09 PM.


#12 musicman153

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 09:57 PM

while i am NOT a christian,i find the topics concerning them lately to be quite insulting to them.tsu is right,there are many different types out there and they all don't believe the same.but lets keep something in mind,you can find haters in any belief system,or lack thereof.


Mark,

I don't think my original post was disrespectful or insulting at all, Just an observation. I also think that the basics of the ULC were designed to help us get over our prejudice and fear of each other and open discussion and comparison is path to this end.

Peace

#13 Dan56

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 01:58 AM

The bible does not instructed Christians to stay away from non-believers;
"And Jesus answering said unto them, They that are whole need not a physician; but they that are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance" (Luke 5:31-32). We are suppose to be lights in the world and we can't very well do that by living separately and hiding from nonbelievers. "Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven" (Matthew 5:14-16).

There are some religions like the Amish that literally separate themselves from the world, but I believe the scripture is referring to a spiritual separation by which we are not to conform to the world, flesh, or sin. "Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you" (2 Corinthians 6:14-17).

Edited by Dan56, 21 July 2012 - 01:59 AM.


#14 Tsukino_Rei

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 03:32 AM

That's true Dan! But there are also Christians who will use the verses about being in the world but not of the world, and even more erroneously the separation of the wheat from the chaff, also to argue for staying away from the secular. In my home community of 9 Churches the Bahai family was very ostracised. Most children were not allowed to play with their children, myself among them. Those passages were brought out a lot in Sunday School and Church. =o( I had a reputation for being argumentative with my pointed questions. The second most defiant thing I ever did at that age was sit down with my Bahai class mates and ask them about what they believed in. The first most defiant thing I ever did was secretly go to one of their events, celebrating global customs and cuisine. I lied to my mum about where I was going!

Sadly, Evangelists and Christian writers who teach separation and fear are far too prevalent in western Christian culture at the moment. Those who are more liberal and curious tend to be shouted down. There just isn't enough liberal Christian media out there to make itself known as a philosophy that actually is much more prevalent than it seems!

Edited by Tsukino_Rei, 21 July 2012 - 03:39 AM.


#15 Fawzo

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 04:11 AM

In a cult it is most important to keep the sheeple segregated and secluded until they are fully indoctrinated lest they should encounter the truth and learn from it and leave the group.

#16 Zequatanil

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 06:36 AM

With the deepest of respect Dan--all that you are saying is correct, however this is over 2, 000 years later. The gospels may be interpreted differently--even a word will make a major difference. My question to you is--what would Jesus say today? And what would His instructions be for today`s world ?

blessings and peace,
S

#17 Jonathan H. B. Lobl

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 08:40 AM

That's true Dan! But there are also Christians who will use the verses about being in the world but not of the world, and even more erroneously the separation of the wheat from the chaff, also to argue for staying away from the secular. In my home community of 9 Churches the Bahai family was very ostracised. Most children were not allowed to play with their children, myself among them. Those passages were brought out a lot in Sunday School and Church. =o( I had a reputation for being argumentative with my pointed questions. The second most defiant thing I ever did at that age was sit down with my Bahai class mates and ask them about what they believed in. The first most defiant thing I ever did was secretly go to one of their events, celebrating global customs and cuisine. I lied to my mum about where I was going!

Sadly, Evangelists and Christian writers who teach separation and fear are far too prevalent in western Christian culture at the moment. Those who are more liberal and curious tend to be shouted down. There just isn't enough liberal Christian media out there to make itself known as a philosophy that actually is much more prevalent than it seems!



"As you sew, you will reap."

How very sad. You can be sure that these B'hai children took away their own lessons from this treatment. They have learned much about "Christian Love." Far more than their Christian neighbors intended.

#18 emalpaiz

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 08:56 AM

I have another question for you. Why would Non-Christians want to "consort" with them?


I live in an island where the majority are Christians. If you want to have a friend, most probably it is going to be a Christian. Most of my Christian friends are very liberal. Thoroughout the years I have met very few persons that were uncomfortable with my religion. I for one do not care what the religion or lack of religion my friends have. I have a very good Roman Catholic friend and periodically we talk of religious issues.

One last thing, I eventually married a Christian. Come August we will celebrate 36 years of marriage.

Hermano Luis

Edited by emalpaiz, 21 July 2012 - 08:58 AM.


#19 musicman153

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 09:16 AM

I live in an island where the majority are Christians. If you want to have a friend, most probably it is going to be a Christian. Most of my Christian friends are very liberal. Thoroughout the years I have met very few persons that were uncomfortable with my religion. I for one do not care what the religion or lack of religion my friends have. I have a very good Roman Catholic friend and periodically we talk of religious issues.

One last thing, I eventually married a Christian. Come August we will celebrate 36 years of marriage.

Hermano Luis


Congratulations Hermano and Happy anniversary,

I don't base friendship's on religion and usually I don't know what a persons religion is until long after the friendship has been established. I also would not end a friendship because I found that they were a Jehovah's Witness, Mormon or even a Satanist.

My main point in this thread was, that by segregating oneself from other cultures and religions we leave ourselves to form opinions about others that are based on second hand and often wrong information. For instance, many have now formed their opinions on the Muslim religion based on the acts of terrorist groups that are using this religion as justification for their actions. That's just about as fair as basing your opinions of Christianity on the actions of the KKK who also claimed to be following their religious convictions.

The Buddha said "The one thing all humans have in common is they want to be happy"

Edited by musicman153, 21 July 2012 - 09:17 AM.


#20 Jonathan H. B. Lobl

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:15 AM

I live in an island where the majority are Christians. If you want to have a friend, most probably it is going to be a Christian. Most of my Christian friends are very liberal. Thoroughout the years I have met very few persons that were uncomfortable with my religion. I for one do not care what the religion or lack of religion my friends have. I have a very good Roman Catholic friend and periodically we talk of religious issues.

One last thing, I eventually married a Christian. Come August we will celebrate 36 years of marriage.

Hermano Luis



Perhaps, I mis-spoke. My question was -- Why would a nonchristian want to consort with a Christian -- who looks down on nonchristians?"

Happy anniversary.

#21 musicman153

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 02:53 PM

Perhaps, I mis-spoke. My question was -- Why would a nonchristian want to consort with a Christian -- who looks down on nonchristians?"

Happy anniversary.


Well that's part of the problem isn't it? Christian preachers and teachers seem to spread this "Superior" attitude that we are the chosen and all others are heathens and thus condemned no matter if they are good people or not. So they look down on others because they were taught to do so. In in itself, that's so un-Christian.

Edited by musicman153, 21 July 2012 - 02:57 PM.


#22 Dan56

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 11:38 PM

With the deepest of respect Dan--all that you are saying is correct, however this is over 2, 000 years later. The gospels may be interpreted differently--even a word will make a major difference. My question to you is--what would Jesus say today? And what would His instructions be for today`s world ?


I believe Christ's message is unchanging, its up to us to interpret it correctly and not fall victim to religious malarkey.

Jesus said, "
Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself" (Matthew 22:39). He didn't stipulate that this was limited to a brother or fellow Christian/Jew. Also consider;
"But he, willing to justify himself, said to Jesus, And who is my neighbor? Jesus responded with the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10: 25-37), which demonstrated what "love your neighbor" meant towards your treatment of others, including nonbelievers.

Peter said, "Ye know how that it is an unlawful thing for a man that is a Jew to keep company, or come unto one of another nation; but God hath shewed me that I should not call any man common or unclean" (Acts 10:28)
.

Christ avoided no one, he came so that nonbelievers might believe, and he instructed believers to not only love one another, but even your enemies (Matthew 5:44). So imo, Christian denominations who teach seclusion and non-association with people outside of their faith are missing the point.


#23 Tsukino_Rei

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 12:26 AM

I live in an island where the majority are Christians. If you want to have a friend, most probably it is going to be a Christian. Most of my Christian friends are very liberal. Thoroughout the years I have met very few persons that were uncomfortable with my religion. I for one do not care what the religion or lack of religion my friends have. I have a very good Roman Catholic friend and periodically we talk of religious issues.

One last thing, I eventually married a Christian. Come August we will celebrate 36 years of marriage.

Hermano Luis


:biggrinthumb: That's AWESOME! I want to hug you both for being a shining example of religious tolerance.

#24 emalpaiz

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 11:27 AM

Perhaps, I mis-spoke. My question was -- Why would a nonchristian want to consort with a Christian -- who looks down on nonchristians?"

Happy anniversary.


In my work -- where almost everyone is Christian -- there is one person who claims to be a devout Christian, but who insists that only his version of Christianity is true. Sadly to say he is a very lonely man.

#25 Jonathan H. B. Lobl

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 05:43 PM

How sad for him. He forgets that his role model -- Jesus -- is reported to have associated with everybody.




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