All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    Hebrew Roots

    How odd. It seem to me that the natural expression of Torah, is Orthodox Judaism.
  3. RabbiO

    Hebrew Roots

    Hebrew Roots is a Christian movement.
  4. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    Hebrew Roots

    Maybe. Are you talking about Jews? Or Christians?
  5. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    I went back over this thread, looking for what you're responding too. I can't find it. What are you responding too?
  6. cuchulain

    a common atheist fallacy

    it could be argued that nothing is knowable, if taken to extremes. if someone is using that, they are by self definition simply baiting or trolling, since they can't learn.
  7. Gail1954

    Hebrew Roots

    It means to follow the Torah and it's holidays.
  8. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    1. People have a right to be silly. Also mistaken and just plain wrong. If people want to believe in fairies or the wee folk, this is also not my problem. Beliefs about God or the gods are also out of reach. We can encourage critical thinking -- but we can not control belief. Just as well. If belief were controllable -- we would not be happy. Truly -- I don't Know what your issue is. For your own sake, I urge you to let it go. 2. You might remember that the next time we talk about Reiki or Therapeutic Touch. 3. What doctors do actually matters. Medical practice evolves. So does accountability. So do the rules regarding compensation. In England, the government does not pay for Homeopathy.
  9. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    My wife cares, so it matters to me. If "forest brides" are a real thing, it matters to them and to those who care about them. You don't care, but it still may matter to you. It is hard to accurately gauge the impact of something when you know little about it. Like doctors back in the day thinking that hand washing doesn't matter, you know?
  10. Last week
  11. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    Do you think I'm only skeptical about God and Scripture? I'm also not happy with the evidence for Bigfoot. Also alien abduction. I'm not being mean. There are credibility issues.
  12. But Bigfoot has been seen by eye witnesses.. Granted, its usually witnessed by someone named Bubba while he was fishing down on the Bayou, but he swears the 12 pack of beer he had just finished in no way impaired his vision.. It was definitely a large fur covered bear-like creature standing upright.. How much more proof do you need? 😊
  13. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    Does it actually matter whether the Bigfoot species exists? I mean, it's silly, but so what? Besides which -- objective evidence could turn up. It's not likely, but it's possible. The Flat Earth people are crazy. So are the Hollow Earth people. Big Foot? Really. Why do you care? It's so trivial. Not every battle is worth fighting. Just because it's silly and lacking in evidence -- does not make it worth fighting. People will always be into foolish crap. Most of it does not matter.
  14. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    There is no good reason for me to think it exists. That does not mean there is no good reason for someone else to think it exists. There was a period in time where people were reporting seeing black swans, but were not producing other evidence of what they had seen. It was reasonable for them to believe their own eyes, and reasonable for others to doubt their word. My wife has a story. We explain it differently, but I wasn't there.
  15. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    Bigfoot is the classic Black Swan. There is no good reason to think that it exists -- but it could.
  16. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    Of course. I have made that point several times in this thread. Being skeptical of skepticism is good. It is easy to become unwilling and/or unable to see new information about a subject fairly. It is hard to realize that it has happened to you. The urge to think of ourselves as fair and open-minded makes it painful to look at our prejudices directly. I often have to remind myself that I do not know that Bigfoot does not exist. I simply habe a strong opinion that is not directly contradicted by the evidence that has been available to me up to this point.
  17. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    I wanted to go back and make sure my position is clear. If you tell me that you can prove God exists -- with objective, verifiable evidence -- then I want to see the evidence. If you tell me that you have faith that God exists -- there's nothing to argue about. You believe. Great. I've got no problem with that. The basic Atheist position is simple. I don't believe. Nobody is saying that you can't believe.
  18. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    Skepticism, like anything else, can be taken too far. When no evidence or study is good enough.
  19. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    I think the ultimate placebo is prayer. It seems to make people happy. Some arguments are not worth it.
  20. RevBogovac

    a common atheist fallacy

    No, but I like to use science to build my knowledge, but if you wish to build your knowledge on another basis... go ahead. You just go and do that. I would be quite grateful if/when you succeed. But in the mean time I'll go for the desired effect using the shortest route available... Too bad, there are a lot of benefits in the practical application of things you might consider "lack of knowledge" as for instance the "self for-filling prophecy" and "positive [self-] enforcement"... But if you choose to discuss the epistemology instead, that might lead to an interesting debate.
  21. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    So, what I am actually doing is discussing applied epistemology. I am talking about the limits of knowledge, the difference between opinion and fact. Far from attempting to justify what is not there, I am warning against the dangers of using lack of knowledge to justify belief that something is not there. I am a proponent of doubt. I am a salesman for lack of certainty. This is the skeptical position, which is my default position on most subjects. Moral issues are my skeptical blind-spot.
  22. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    Well, that's just it. Either the placebo was not a placebo, or there was some other factor involved. As such, simply crediting the placebo would prevent learning the actual cause. As an example, I saw a study where fake acupuncture was more effective at pain management than actual acupuncture. Digging into the details, I find that the difference is most easily attributed to patient expectations produced when signing consent forms. The fake acupuncture recipients were given a long list of fake potential side-effecfs for the treatment, while the recipients of the real acupuncture were not. Not only were they more likely to think their treatment was effective, but they were more likely to think they needed to quit the study early due to the fake acupuncture giving them dry mouth. By understanding that the placebo is not the cause, we have the opportunity to learn how to get the desired effect without the placebo.
  23. mererdog

    a common atheist fallacy

    You were replying to me. I said knowledge. You now say you weren't talking about the same thing as me. And this is my bad?
  24. Welcome and hope you enjoy! I look forward to hearing about what you do with your ordination!
  25. Jonathan H. B. Lobl

    a common atheist fallacy

    I understand. You're putting your eggs into the faith basket -- instead of the evidence basket. You don't understand me at all. I don't have a problem with this. What I do have a problem with, is confusing faith with evidence.
  26. Thank you Mark 45. A Druid who studies and applies the teachings and techniques of gnosis / Gnosticism.
  1. Load more activity